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Hi teachers,
According to this paragraph:
Then Coke hit him on the chin as hard as he could. Baxter fell to the ground heavily. At that moment, Halls jumped on Coke from behind but Coke threw him over his back and against a tree, and then ran back towards the road before Halls could get up.

Could you correct or confirm these questions and answers?
1. When did Halls jump on Coke from behind?
a) When Baxter fell to the ground heavily.
b) After Baxter fell to the ground heavily.
2. Who was stronger, Halls or Coke?
3. How do you know it? Because Coke threw Halls over his back and against a tree.
4. Where did Coke head for?
a) He ran back towards the road. (Not sure about this one at all)
b) He head for the road.

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
1. When did Halls jump on Coke from behind?
a) When Baxter fell to the ground heavily.
b) After Baxter fell to the ground heavily.
2. Who was stronger, Halls or Coke?
3. How do you know it? Because Coke threw Halls over his back and against a tree.
4. Where did Coke head for? OR, better I think: What did Coke head for?
a) He ran back towards the road. (Not sure about this one at all) (Right. It's not the greatest answer to that question.)
b) He headed for the road.< Better answer.

All OK except where noted.

CJ
CalifJim4. Where did Coke head for? OR, better I think: What did Coke head for?
Hi Jim,
Thank you very much for your reply. I really don't get that one. Why is it better 'what' than 'where'.
Aren't we talking about direction?

TS
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Thinking SpainWhy is it better 'what' than 'where'
It sounded better to me in the context. A road is a what (a thing) more than a where (a place) in my mind.

The problem is that the thing we head for is used as a way of indicating a place, so both are possible. Now that you've made me think about it more, maybe 'where' is the more correct word. You've got me confused now! I think it's the "for" that bothers me.

Where are you headed?
Where/What are you headed for?

I'm
headed for the bank.
headed for the bridge.
headed for the restaurant.

I think I'd solve this puzzle by leaving out 'for' in the question. I'd probably say, Where was Coke headed?

CJ
Hi Jim,
Thank you very much for your help.
I guess the meaning of 'where are you heading for? / where are you heading?' is the same, isn't it?
The answer is 'subject + verb + preposition + place'.
Right?

TS
Thinking SpainI guess the meaning of 'where are you heading for? / where are you heading?' is the same, isn't it?The answer is 'subject + verb + preposition + place'.
Yes.

CJ
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Hi Jim,
Thank you for your reply.

TS