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Hi teachers,
This is the contex:
That was my friend George from the house down the road. Somebody saw you at the window this morning. It was that woman from the post office. The police give her money, and she tells them all the secrets of the village. Everybody hates her!

Could you correct or confirm these sentences?
a) What did the woman from the post poffice use to do? She used to tell the police all the secrets of the village.
b) How many people felt hostility toward(s) the woman from the post office? Everybody.

Thanks in advance.
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Thinking Spaincontext Emotion: smile
Thinking Spaina) What did the woman from the post office used to do? She used to tell the police all the secrets of the village.
There are a couple spelling mistakes, otherwise fine if you really meant "used to". This suggests that she no longer does it. She stopped, died, etc.
Thinking Spainb) How many people felt hostility toward(s) the woman from the post office? Everybody.
"Hostility" is a good synonym, if it's not too advanced for your students. Nice job as always! Emotion: smile
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Shawn79There are a couple spelling mistakes, otherwise fine if you really meant "used to". This suggests that she no longer does it. She stopped, died, etc.
Hi Shawn,
Thank you for your reply.
That was my doubt, if I can use the verb 'use to'. My reason to do it, it is because I take the text as past time. I don't really know if she has died or not, if she has stopped doing it or not. Then, am I right in using that verb or not?

What did the woman from the post office used to do?
You can't use the 'd'. It is a typical mistake. Why not? Because you have the auxiliary 'did' in the question. Am I right?

"Hostility" is a good synonym, if it's not too advanced for your students.No it isn't, just because it has a Latin root.

TS
Thinking SpainWhat did the woman from the post office used to do? You can't use the 'd'. It is a typical mistake. Why not? Because you have the auxiliary 'did' in the question. Am I right?
Oops, you're exactly right. I'm sorry. Thanks for correcting me. I first saw office misspelled then turned my attention to "use" without reading the whole sentence, but I agree with you. Emotion: embarrassed
Thinking Spain"Hostility" is a good synonym, if it's not too advanced for your students.No it isn't, just because it has a Latin root.
Excellent!
Thinking SpainThat was my doubt, if I can use the verb 'use to'. My reason to do it, it is because I take the text as past time. I don't really know if she has died or not, if she has stopped doing it or not. Then, am I right in using that verb or not?
If you aren't certain the habitual action has stopped then I would not use "used to". The actions are described in the present tense in the narrative (give/tells). I would ask: "What does the woman do?"
Oops, you're exactly right. I'm sorry. Thanks for correcting me. I first saw office misspelled then turned my attention to "use" without reading the whole sentence, but I agree with you.
Hi Shawn,
I think there won't be another one. I pointed out this one just because I have heard some native speakers saying that. Believe me if I tell you that I'm so happy to correct them. I guess I have my only one brain cell trained for that one.Emotion: wink
Shawn79If you aren't certain the habitual action has stopped then I would not use "used to". The actions are described in the present tense in the narrative (give/tells). I would ask: "What does the woman do?"
Well, I assumed that since it is a story that has been publisheed in 1991, it is not real. So, I thought I could use 'use to'. About your second point, I will write the question in the past, just to be consistent with my other questions which are also in the past. What do you think? Or should I use the simple present just because the actions are described in the present tense in the narrative?

TS
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