I wrote an essay about Ayers Rock. It's due on Monday and it would be great if someone could correct my grammar and spelling.

Ayers Rock is a large sandstone rock formation in central Australia, located in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park.

Its official and aboriginal name is “Uluru” though “ Ayers Rock” is the most commonly used name, especially outside Australia. It refers to Henry Ayers, the Chief Secretary of South Australia in the 1870s.

The rock is more than 348m high and 9km around the base and reaches several miles into the ground, although it is not exactly known how far. Uluru is naturally grey , but the iron content of the rock is rusting at the surface, which results in the red ground color.

Ayers Rock and Kata Tjupa, the other rock formation in the national park, are most likely leftovers of a mountain range that has formed millions of years ago.

Aborigines settled down in the area at least 20 000 years ago, while the arrival of Europeans at Ayers Rock was part of an exploration during the 1870s. William Gosse was the first European to see Ayer's Rock but couldn’t reach it because of the lack of water. He returned to the area in 1873 and was the first European who climbed the rock.

Around 1900 the area was declared a reservation for aboriginal people and this existed until the 1940s. In 1950 Uluru was made a national park and in the 80s the land was handed back to the traditional owners, the aboriginal tribe of Anangu. This happened under the condition that tourists were still allowed to climb the rock, since climbing Uluru is a great attraction for visitors.

The Anangu ask visitors to respect their culture and law and to not climb the rock due to the fact that Uluru is the most important place in the aboriginal culture. Aborigines believe that it is alive with the presence of ancestral beings who formed the rock and still inhabit it. The path, that is typically taken by visitors to the top, is a very spiritual one, that’s why the Anangu prefer if tourists do not use it as a common footpath.

Besides the religious reason it is also not exactly without danger to climb the rock. Over the years there have been at least 35 deaths because of climbing incidents. Because of their spiritual connection to Uluru the Aborigines feel great sadness when a person dies or is injured while climbing the rock.

Even though many people don’t care about that and climb, there are several alternatives. From a distance Ayers Rock looks really smooth, but there all kinds of holes, , tunnels, natural and . Visitors can circle the base and pass sacred aboriginal grounds like the Kantju waterhole.

Ayers Rock is a large sandstone rock formation in central Australia, located in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park.

Its official and aboriginal name is “Uluru” though “Ayers Rock” is the more commonly used name, especially outside Australia. It refers to Henry Ayers, the Chief Secretary of South Australia in the 1870s.

The rock is more than 348m high and 9km around the base and reaches several miles into the ground, although it is not exactly known how far. Uluru is naturally grey, but the iron content of the rock is rusting at the surface, which results in the red ground color.

(Transition missing here. Something about the rock having a long history, perhaps?) Ayers Rock and Kata Tjupa, the other rock formation in the national park, are most likely leftovers of a mountain range that has formed millions of years ago.

Aborigines settled down in the area at least 20 000 years ago. It was not until the 1870s before the Europeans arrived as part of an exploration. William Gosse was the first European to see Ayers Rock but couldn’t reach it because of the lack of water. He returned to the area in 1873 and was the first European who climbed the rock.

Around 1900 the area was declared a reservation for aboriginal people and this remained the case until the 1940s. In 1950 Uluru was made a national park and in the 80s the land was handed back to the traditional owners, the aboriginal tribe of Anangu, on the condition that tourists were still allowed to climb the rock, since climbing Uluru is a great attraction for visitors.

However, the Anangu ask visitors to respect their culture and law and to not climb the rock due to the fact that Uluru is the most important place in the aboriginal culture. Aborigines believe that it is alive with the presence of ancestral beings who formed the rock and still inhabit it. The path, that is typically taken by visitors to the top, is a very spiritual one, and that’s why the Anangu prefer if tourists do not use it as a common footpath.

Besides the religious reason it is also not exactly without danger to climb the rock. Over the years there have been at least 35 deaths because of climbing incidents. Because of their spiritual connection to Uluru the Aborigines feel great sadness when a person dies or is injured while climbing the rock.

Even though many people don’t care about that and climb, there are several alternatives to...(add your own words. From a distance Ayers Rock looks really smooth, but up close there are all kinds of holes, caves, tunnels, natural sculptures and paintings. Visitors can circle the base and pass sacred aboriginal grounds like the Kantju waterhole.

Thanks for your effort, you have been a great help to me =)
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great overall