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Could you please help me correct these sentences?

1 I'm surer that I paid 200 for my bike than (I am sure) that I paid 1500 for my car. I don't remember exactly how much my car cost but I'm sure my bike cost 200.
2 I'm hurting for you. I feel your pain. I feel for you.
3 They don't pay me enough for me to even bother doing that.
4 That'll give me an idea of what I want my house to look like.
5 This schedule is a hard one to maintain. You work a lot one week and you barely work then next. If you can hold out the week you work a lot then it's a dream schedule you have.
6 Is there any way you can fill out your schedule over a month in your phone calendar and have the calendar duplicate it over the year automatically?
7 From afar, he looked like someone who could potentially be a client.

Thank you
Comments  
1 I'm surer that I paid 200 for my bike than (I am sure) that I paid 1500 for my car. I don't remember exactly how much my car cost but I'm sure my bike cost 200.
You add the suffix -r/-er to an adjective or adverb to show it is relatively greater: i.e. "He ran fast but she ran faster" or "This house is big, although mine is bigger"; however they can only be applied to adjectives or adverbs that have different levels of magnitude: i.e. something can be faster than something else, and something can be bigger than something else, but you cannot be more sure of something and if there is any doubt then you are not sure. You can, however, be less sure of something: i.e. "I'm pretty sure I turned the oven off". Just remember that sure is similar to certain.
I'm pretty sure that I paid $200 for my bike and I'm sure I paid $1500 for my car.
I think that you wanted to say that you paid more for the car, if that's right then I would probably say:
I paid more for my car than my bike. I'm sure I paid $1500 for the car and I pretty sure the bike cost $200.
2 I'm hurting for you. I feel your pain. I feel for you.
A phrase like this is usually reduced to an "I'm sorry". For instance, "I'm sorry your dog died.." or "I'm sorry you lost your job", saying sorry in this kind fo situation includes an understanding that you feel bad for them.
3 They don't pay me enough for me to even bother doing that.
This is actually fine although I would probably remove the "for me", i.e. "They don't pay me enough to even bother doing that", just make sure that you have said or shown what 'that' refers to, i.e. "Cleaning the toilets... they don't pay me enough to even bother doing that/this"
4 That'll give me an idea of what I want my house to look like.
I can see nothing wrong with that sentence.
5 This schedule is a hard one to maintain. You work a lot one week and you barely work then next. If you can hold out the week you work a lot then it's a dream schedule you have.
"You work a lot one week and you barely work then next", you want 'the' not 'then' because you are describing what the next (week) is like compared to the week before and not a chain of events, i.e. "This week I'm working 4 shifts then next week I'm working 3".
Unfortunately I do not understand the second sentence because "If you can hold out the week" means to bare with a difficult or hard situation and yet the dream schedule is to work a lot and bare it - this seems a contradiction.
6 Is there any way you can fill out you schedule over a month in your phone calendar and have the calendar duplicate it over the year automatically?
Remember 'you' refers to the other person, whereas 'your' refers to the other person's possession - which is what you want. Also 'over a month' translates as over the course of a month, i.e. can you, for everyday this month, fill out your schedule; but you want to say: "this month's schedule", that is, the schedule of this month. Also, even though the calendar is a digital version on the phone, you're still putting information on it. Also just like 'over a month' saying 'over the year' means it will continually do throughout the year, but you want to say "for the year". Also it's a small issue, but you'd say 'mobile' and not 'phone', as 'phone' refers to a landline telephone. So the end result is something like:
Is there any way you can fill out your month's schedule on your mobile's calendar, and have the calendar duplicate it for the year automatically?
7 From afar, he looked like someone who could potentially be a client.
This one is almost right except that you're mixing tenses, 'looked' means it was past tense, and yet 'could' means it is present. You want either:
From afar, he looks like someone who could potentially be a client.
or
From afar, he looked like someone who could have potentially been a client

Hope this helps
1. I sure I paid $200 for my bike but I don't remember exactly how much my car cost. I think around $1500.

2. These are all ok to use with a friend or family member.

3.The don't pay me enough to do that.

4. Is fine, but the contraction sounds awkward. 'That will' always sounds better.

5.This schedule is a hard one to maintain. You work a lot one week and barely work the next. If you can make it through the week you work a lot, then you have a dream schedule.

6. 6 Is there any way you can fill out your schedule over a month in your phone calendar and have the calendar duplicate it each month over the year automatically?

7 From afar, he looked like someone who may be a potential client. I thought the original was ok as well.
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Makka -- I think you're working too hard and "correcting" many things that don't need correcting.

1.
makka2802you cannot be more sure of something and if there is any doubt then you are not sure. You can, however, be less sure of something:
This doesn't make any sense -- if you can be less sure of one thing, you can be more sure of something else.
makka2802I think that you wanted to say that you paid more for the car, if that's right then I would probably say:
I paid more for my car than my bike. I'm sure I paid $1500 for the car and I pretty sure the bike cost $200.
I don't think that's what he wants to say at all. He wants to say that he's more certain of the bike's price than of the car's price.

"Surer" is okay logically but it sounds a little odd -- I would suggest "more certain."

2.
makka2802I'm hurting for you. I feel your pain. I feel for you
These are all fine. A bit meoldramatic, but people certainly say things like this.

3. The original is okay, and your version is also okay, but "They don't pay me enough to do that" is more idiomatic.

4. fine.

5., 6. I'm pretty sure some of the things you corrected in great detail here are just typos. Alc24 knows the difference between "you" and "your." Of course, as a new member you really have no way of knowing that (unless you notice that errors like you/your and the/then are pretty inconsistent with the overall level of his English as shown by the rest of his post).
makka2802Also it's a small issue, but you'd say 'mobile' and not 'phone', as 'phone' refers to a landline telephone.
In the U.S. we don't call a cell phone a mobile. We call it a phone.

7. From afar, he looked like someone who could potentially be a client.
There's nothing wrong with the original here.

I don't mean to be harsh or discouraging -- I hope these comments will give you a better idea of what kind of corrections are the most useful. If you are not certain that something is gramatically incorrect -- if it's more a matter of style, like the sentences in #2, there's no need to change it.
Quite clearly I need to be more careful with what I say. Thank you for taking the time to point out my errors.
Thank you all for helping me with these I greatly appreciate it.

I had a few question for you Khoff, if you will,

1 I'm surer that I paid 200 for my bike than (I am sure) that I paid 1500 for my car. I don't remember exactly how much my car cost but I'm sure my bike cost 200.

Khoff, you said "surer" was ok, but "more certain" is better. How would you write this, would you lease in the (I am sure)

5 This schedule is a hard one to maintain. You work a lot one week and you barely work then next. If you can hold out the week you work a lot then it's a dream schedule you have.

Kevin rewrote this sentence and took out HOLD OUT. What do you think of it in the sentence?

6 Is there any way you can fill out your schedule over a month in your phone calendar and have the calendar duplicate it over the year automatically?

To you, does this sentence need correcting?

Thank you to all

Ps thank you khoff for the compliment
" Alc24 knows the difference between "you" and "your." Of course, as a new member you really have no way of knowing that (unless you notice that errors like you/your and the/then are pretty inconsistent with the overall level of his English as shown by the rest of his post)."

Alex
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Hello Khoff,

Could you please tell me how you'd say the above 3 sentences I was having trouble with?

Thank you so much