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Hello,
Could you please examine the following unrelated sentences for grammar errors? I suspect that there are some.

) An adjective is a part of speech that modifies a noun or a pronoun.

) The exam was adjourned since the the professor was ill.

) The government has adjudged that the country economics is experiencing hard times so the tax rates will be tenfold-increased (increased tenfold?).

) An octahedron consists of six apices and eight triangle faces.

) As Lord Henry notices, Dorian truly was a very handsome young man.

) Following E.F.Codd, lets designate a table row in a database as a tuple.

) It's rather late and there're no 24/7 grocery shops 'round here, so we'll have to manage with what is in the fridge at the moment.

) The "80/20 rule" provides us with a general idea that eighty percent of the effect are caused by twenty percent of the effort. Despite that this ratio was evolved by Vilfredo Pareto for a very particular case, many people use this ratio as is irrespectively of whether it could be applied for their case in its original form or could be applied there at all.

) You can wait a bit up to the cooking is in progress, but then, as a reward for such a great patience, you'll get a bit of a cherry pie.

) Henry VIII wasn't such an ingenious politician, but he ruled England with a {firm|steady|hard} hand.

) Let's cast a quick glance at the following passage.

) A plenty of to do has piled up to (at?) the end of the week, but don't worry - Jeff is going to work at the weekend and he's a host in himself.

Any comments are greatly appreciated.
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) An adjective is a part of speech that modifies a noun or a pronoun. -- OK

) The exam was adjourned since the the professor was ill.

) The government has adjudged that the country's economy is experiencing hard times so the tax rates will be increased tenfold. -- seems an infeasibly huge tax hike!

) An octahedron consists of six vertices and eight triangular faces.

) As Lord Henry notices, Dorian truly was a very handsome young man. -- This is possible, but usually you would say "noticed ... was" or "notices ... is" so as to keep the tenses consistent.

) Following E. F. Codd, let's designate a table row in a database as a tuple.

) It's rather late and there are ["there're" reflects the common colloquial pronunciation, but it's not a recognised written contraction] no 24/7 grocery shops round here, so we'll have to manage with what is in the fridge at the moment.

) The "80/20 rule" provides us with a general idea that eighty percent of the effect is achieved ["caused" is not actually wrong] by twenty percent of the effort. Despite the fact that this ratio was evolved by Vilfredo Pareto for a very specific case, many people assume that it is universally true and apply it inappropriately. [Your original seemed a bit confused and repetitious. There are many ways you could say more-or-less the same thing. I've just chosen one that seems reasonable.]

) You can wait a bit up to the cooking is in progress, [I'm not very clear what you're trying to say here. Perhaps you mean "You need to wait a while for the cooking"?] but then, as a reward for such a great patience, you'll get a bit of a cherry pie.

) Henry VIII wasn't such an ingenious politician, but he ruled England with a firm/steady hand. -- a "hard hand" is not very natural to me

) Let's cast a quick glance at the following passage. -- OK

) Plenty of things to do have piled up at the end of the week, but don't worry -- [should be a dash, not a hyphen] Jeff is going to work at the weekend and he's a host in himself. -- I don't understand this sentence. I'm not very clear what what Jeff being a "host in himself" means or what it has to do with what's gone before.
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Hi Mr Wordy,

Thanks for your comments.

> tax rates will be increased tenfold. -- seems an infeasibly huge tax hike!

It has nothing to do with any real-world tax increase, so there is no reason
to worry =)

>> You can wait a bit up to the cooking is in progress, but then, as
>> a reward for such a great patience, you'll get a bit of a cherry pie.
> [I'm not very clear what you're trying to say here. Perhaps you mean
> "You need to wait a while for the cooking"?]

In other words it can be expressed as follows: "The food is still being prepared,
but if you wait a little you'll get a bit of a cherry pie..." I've used "cooking"
in the original sentence with the meaning of "a process of food preparation".

>> Plenty of things to do have piled up at the end of the week, but don't
>> worry -- Jeff is going to work at the weekend and he's a host in himself.
> I don't understand this sentence. I'm not very clear what Jeff
> being a "host in himself" means or what it has to do with what's gone
> before.

Either my dictionary lies or I don't understand the meaning of the "a host in
oneself" expression. By saying "a host in oneself" I meant that Jeff works
as good as ten other workers unitedly (taken together) would do, so it's not
necessary to worry about the great amount of accumulated work - Jeff will
probably sort out all these problems at the weekend.

And once more, thanks for detailed comments.
victor_amelkinIn other words it can be expressed as follows: "The food is still being prepared,
but if you wait a little you'll get a bit of a cherry pie..." I've used "cooking"
in the original sentence with the meaning of "a process of food preparation".

The above sentence is fine (except it would be more usual to say "a bit of cherry pie"). The meaning of "cooking" is clear; what threw me was the construction "You can wait a bit up to the cooking is in progress". This isn't grammatical, and the only way to glean a meaning is to identify the key words such as "wait" and "cooking" and then try to guess a likely relationship between them.
victor_amelkinEither my dictionary lies or I don't understand the meaning of the "a host in
oneself" expression. By saying "a host in oneself" I meant that Jeff works
as good as ten other workers unitedly (taken together) would do, so it's not
necessary to worry about the great amount of accumulated work - Jeff will
probably sort out all these problems at the weekend.
You may be right. Google gives sufficient hits to indicate that "a host in himself" is an established expression of some sort. I'm familiar with "host" as a word for a large number of people, but I've never come across this particular expression and I didn't associate that meaning with it. I'm not sure if the expression is appropriate for use in contemporary everyday text. I'm wondering if perhaps it's old-fashioned or literary. Perhaps someone else would care to comment?