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I'm having trouble understand first person on this essay. I'll highlight what I think is first person and I would appreciate if someone confirm it. After that, could you guys help me change it to a third person view? Thank you in advance.

Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has three different dynamic strategies, which are often combined. The best known is social screening; but in my opinion the other two are just as important, shareholder activism and community investment. Basically, these three strategies are used to incorporate our personal values and concern for society into our investment and financial decisions. The following quote from www.socialinvest.org will help you determine what is best for your future investments:

Social screening is “the practice of including, excluding, or evaluating publicly traded securities from investment portfolios or mutual funds based on social or environment criteria.” Social screening can be either positive or negative. Positive screenings seek the most progressive companies, while negative screenings avoid specific companies. Example of negative screening would be of companies that cause illness, damage the environment, or reveal deceptive business practices. Meanwhile, positive screenings eliminates negative factors and seek ways to maximize investment returns. Ask yourself whether you want to invest in companies that causes harm to society or in ones that will make you money and let you sleep well? I personally would not want to be an investor in an activity that goes against my ethics.

The Corporate Governance Glossary defines shareholder activism as “a group or individual that takes action in an effort to influence management and effect change in the behavior of corporations to increase shareholder value.” ( www.corp-gov.org. ) From my understanding of “Shareholder Activism: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” by Donohue, shareholder activists target companies because of their size as well as their specific stakeholder related practices. The article shows that shareholder activists target companies with shareholder resolutions demanding changes in corporate behavior for companies producing problematic products and where environmental concerns exist. Furthermore, companies in specific industries are targeted based on poor employee and community related practices.

We have discussed social screening, shareholder activism and now community investing. What is community investing? Based on www.socialfunds.com “Community investing addresses the financial needs of low income and underserved communities.” According to the definition, even though community investing generally delivers a below market financial yield, it could also provide a strong social return. A community investor may, for example, open a checking account, saving account, money market account, by doing that, the investor is helping the bank loan out money to low and moderate income families. In general, community investment strives for strong and healthy development.
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Hi,

Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has three different dynamic strategies, which are often combined. The best known is social screening; but in my opinion the other two are just as important, shareholder activism and community investment. Basically, these three strategies are used to incorporate our personal values and concern for society into our investment and financial decisions. The following quote from www.socialinvest.org will help you determine what is best for your future investments:

Social screening is “the practice of including, excluding, or evaluating publicly traded securities from investment portfolios or mutual funds based on social or environment criteria.” Social screening can be either positive or negative. Positive screenings seek the most progressive companies, while negative screenings avoid specific companies. Example of negative screening would be of companies that cause illness, damage the environment, or reveal deceptive business practices. Meanwhile, positive screenings eliminates negative factors and seek ways to maximize investment returns. Ask yourself whether you want to invest in companies that causes harm to society or in ones that will make you money and let you sleep well? I personally would not want to be an investor in an activity that goes against my ethics.

The Corporate Governance Glossary defines shareholder activism as “a group or individual that takes action in an effort to influence management and effect change in the behavior of corporations to increase shareholder value.” ( www.corp-gov.org. ) From my understanding of “Shareholder Activism: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” by Donohue, shareholder activists target companies because of their size as well as their specific stakeholder related practices. The article shows that shareholder activists target companies with shareholder resolutions demanding changes in corporate behavior for companies producing problematic products and where environmental concerns exist. Furthermore, companies in specific industries are targeted based on poor employee and community related practices.

We have discussed social screening, shareholder activism and now community investing. What is community investing? Based on www.socialfunds.com “Community investing addresses the financial needs of low income and underserved communities.” According to the definition, even though community investing generally delivers a below market financial yield, it could also provide a strong social return. A community investor may, for example, open a checking account, saving account, money market account, by doing that, the investor is helping

I've also high-lighted 2rd. person above.

Here is one quick approach to rewording.

Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has three different dynamic strategies, which are often combined. The best known is social screening; but the other two are just as important, shareholder activism and community investment. Basically, these three strategies are used to incorporate personal values and concern for society into investment and financial decisions. The following quote from www.socialinvest.org will help to determine what is best for future investments:

Social screening is “the practice of including, excluding, or evaluating publicly traded securities from investment portfolios or mutual funds based on social or environment criteria.” Social screening can be either positive or negative. Positive screenings seek the most progressive companies, while negative screenings avoid specific companies. Example of negative screening would be of companies that cause illness, damage the environment, or reveal deceptive business practices. Meanwhile, positive screenings eliminates negative factors and seek ways to maximize investment returns. People should ask themselves whether they want to invest in companies that causes harm to society or in ones that will make them money and let them sleep well? Some people would not want to be investors in an activity that goes against their ethics.

The Corporate Governance Glossary defines shareholder activism as “a group or individual that takes action in an effort to influence management and effect change in the behavior of corporations to increase shareholder value.” ( www.corp-gov.org. ) As described in “Shareholder Activism: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” by Donohue, shareholder activists target companies because of their size as well as their specific stakeholder related practices. The article shows that shareholder activists target companies with shareholder resolutions demanding changes in corporate behavior for companies producing problematic products and where environmental concerns exist. Furthermore, companies in specific industries are targeted based on poor employee and community related practices.

This essay has discussed social screening, shareholder activism and now community investing. What is community investing? Based on www.socialfunds.com “Community investing addresses the financial needs of low income and underserved communities.” According to the definition, even though community investing generally delivers a below market financial yield, it could also provide a strong social return. A community investor may, for example, open a checking account, saving account, money market account, by doing that, the investor is helping

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you Clive, very helpful!