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There are so many relative clauses that I can't understand this paragraph?

"Scratch a South Korean, says the foreign diplomat, and he will be unsure of America’s commitment, ready to believe that Japan might turn aggressive again, resentful that China ignores his country’s concerns and alarmed by a dangerous North Korea. South Korea, he adds, “looks a fundamentally lonely place.”

Source: https://www.economist.com/asia/2016/10/27/a-shrimp-among-whales

My question is
1- what does "scratch" mean?
2- does the foreign diplomat work for America?
3- who is object of the phrase " alarmed by a dangerous North Korea"

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doanxuanquyThere are so many relative clauses

There are no relative clauses there.

he will be unsure of America’s commitment
he will be ready to believe that Japan might turn aggressive again
he will be resentful that China ignores his country’s concerns
he will be alarmed by a dangerous North Korea

1. "scratch a South Korean" means something like "arouse a South Korean to discover what he/she really feels".

2. It is not stated in this passage.

3. There is no object. "he" is the subject and "a dangerous North Korea" is the agent.

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Thank you, but can I have one more questions:
- his country's concerns > what is his country? why is his country mentioned?

doanxuanquy- his country's concerns > what is his country? why is his country mentioned?

"his country’s concerns" = South Korea's concerns

The author writes "his country" rather than "South Korea" just for variety.

SO "his" refers to the foreign diplomat?

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doanxuanquy

SO "his" refers to the foreign diplomat?

No, to the South Korean.

thank you! Now that I wrapped my head around it.

Indeed, I tore my hair out over this