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1. I 've been studying adjective clause via a site. http://netgrammar.altec.org/Units/Unit_10/a101c10_101000.html . A piece of sentence in it that I couldn't understand, "If the subject relative pronoun is followed by the verb be in any tense, both the relative pronoun and the verb be can be omitted " . Could you take a instance to explain it for me ? Thanks !!

2. Could you kindly tell me the difference between " as soon as " and " once " ? Thanks !!
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2.
as soon as accentuates immediacy/urgency, once doesn't, but sometimes they're synonymous:
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as soon as

Function: conjunction
: immediately at or just after the time that<as soon as he came, the meeting began>


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once

Variant(s): also once that
Function: conjunction

: when once : if once : at the moment when : as soon as <once the job is finished, we'll have nothing to worry about> <once that he finds you, you'll have to be careful>


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>Could you take a instance to explain it for me
an instant
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Dear Alanou here are some example sentences with different tenses:

* Sandra Bullock, who is a movie star, lives in Hollywood.

* Sandar Bullock , a movie star, lives in Hollywood. ( relative pronoun and be is omitted)

* Alan Wright , who was a successful journalist, died last month.

* Alan Wright , a successful journalist, died last month.

Hope it' a bit clear now.
Marius,

Once (when) you graduate, you will become a successful lawyer. (no urgency)

As soon as you see him, give him the message. (urgent)

Still, sometimes they can be used interchangebly..
PandoraaMarius,

Once (when) you graduate, you will become a successful lawyer. (no urgency)

As soon as you see him, give him the message. (urgent)

Still, sometimes they can be used interchangebly..
This is what I said:
as soon as accentuates immediacy, once doesn't
should have said immediacy/urgency (edited)
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Oooops sorry Marius, it was meant to be a reply for Anoua.. Emotion: embarrassedEmotion: embarrassed
"If the subject relative pronoun is followed by the verb be in any tense, both the relative pronoun and the verb be can be omitted "
This is also called Whiz-Deletion (from which is, who is).

The person who is meeting with us today is the manager of manufacturing. >
The person meeting with us today is the manager of manufacturing.

I normally use that pen which is on the table. >
I normally use that pen on the table.


However, that rule cannot always be applied, for example, when an adjective follows the verb in the relative clause.

The committee chose the plan which was most profitable.
*The committee chose the plan most profitable.

Here, the adjective must be moved to the left.

The committee chose the most profitable plan.


CJ
Thanks all you guys !!! I got it now !
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