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Hi teachers. I'd like to clean the sky about this type. Swan (123.5) tells me that:

"could + have+past participle can refer to present situations which were possible but have not been realised"

He could have been Prime Minister now if he had not decided to leave politics.

So, it looks like Mixed Conditional.

He could be Prime Minister (now, like Second type), if he hadn't decided to leave politics (like Third type, unreal past). Are my statements correct?

Could have past participle is generally used to refer to unreal, unhappened situations in the past, but we are talking now. Is it the same as given above?

He could have been Prime Minister. (but he were not, and he isn't).

Thank for your help so much! Emotion: smile
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Comments  
I'd like to clean the sky clear the air about ... I think that's what you mean, although even if you correct the idiom, the use of it here is still inappropriate. "clear the air" is what you usually do after a heated argument or disagreement.
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could can substitute for would without changing the numbering system of the conditionals.

If ... [past] ..., could ... Second conditional.
If ... had ..., could have ... Third conditional.

If ... [past] ..., could have ... Mixed.
If ... had ..., could ... Mixed.
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Frankly, I find the following just a bit anomalous.

He could have been Prime Minister now if he had not decided to leave politics. [Third, not Mixed, Conditional]

been seems to mean become here, and, in my opinion, it doesn't go with now. To resolve this contradiction, I assign this meaning:

He could have become Prime Minister (in the past) [and if he had become Prime Minister then, he would (still) be Prime Minister now] if he had not decided to leave politics. [The implicit conditional is mixed.]
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I don't understand what you intended to convey by reconstructing this without have: He could be Prime Minister now =~ He [may / might] be PM now =~ Maybe he is PM now. (So I'm going to ignore it!)

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Here's a famous example of the could have been structure:

l0waNRaz6wU


CJ
CalifJimHere's a famous example of the could have been structure:
Wow! Great example, CJ.

It's a perfect pronunciation example for could've been ("coulda been") too.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
could have been

- the most regret-filled words in the English language.

Emotion: crying
CJ
Hi, CalifJim and Amy. Glad to see you. Emotion: smile
CalifJim'd like to clean the sky clear the air about ...
I meant to bring lucidity to the case described. Emotion: smile

I guess I get it.
CalifJimHe could be Prime Minister now =~ He [may / might] be PM now =~ Maybe he is PM now. (So I'm going to ignore it!)
Yes, I'm sorry for writing such a mess, I did it without paying much attention. I tried to compose Mixed Conditional.
CalifJimIf ... [past] ..., could have ... Mixed.

If I didn't work here (now, in present I do work here), I would not have bought a new house
(I've already bought it). Is it OK? Sometimes I'm confused about Mixed.
CalifJimIf ... had ..., could ... Mixed.
If I hadn't done that (past), I was a bunkrupt (now, but fortunately I am not.)

Thank you so much, Jim. By the way, what is the title of the film? I like watching old-time movies.
FandorinBy the way, what is the title of the film?
That quote is from the movie "On the Waterfront".
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047296/quotes
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
FandorinIf I didn't work here (now, in present I do work here), I would not have bought a new house (I've already bought it). Is it OK?
Fine.
FandorinIf I hadn't done that (past), I was a bunkrupt I would be bankrupt (now, but fortunately I am not.)
As corrected.

CJ
Thank you, Amy. The next film to see. Emotion: smile
Thank you, Jim. Useful example and the great film, I guess. Emotion: smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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