Latino immigrants: Assimilating a new culture
Latino immigrants coming to the United States have to face the issue of whether or not assimilate. Understanding this issue is essential to understanding the challenges every Latino has to experience at some point of his or her life. Wrestling with this idea is what drives the issue of assimilation. According to Earl Shorris, “the patterns of assimilation will not all be the same; culture persists and, because it persists, determinates how people live in new circumstances”(12). It means that some Latino immigrants will assimilate the new culture and some of them will refuse to assimilate. What does assimilation means? The word assimilation means how cultures retain or lose its customs-food, language, and music-while absorbing characteristics of a new culture’s way of life. Latino immigrants have to decide in what degree they will assimilate the dominant culture without losing their relationship with their family, language, and cultural traditions.
One of the most important factors that distinguish Latino immigrants from other minorities groups is their love of family. Coming from countries where family was always central, Latino immigrants seen family as the major essential unit against the world. However, the emphasis on family can be a bit surprising for those children of immigrants growing up in the U.S where the individual, not the family, has central importance in society. In “Real Women Have Curves”, written by Josefina Lopez and George La Voo, Ana, a Mexican- American teenager deals with the situation of going away from home to go to college because their family insists that they cannot be apart from each other.
In addition to assimilating the new culture without losing the relationship with their family, Latinos immigrants have to deal with a new language. Language is significant because it determinates a form of identity. Latinos know they must learn English in order to be successful in the U.S. "In many jobs I qualify as a speaker, but I need to read and write," said Mohammad. "You can't go anywhere in this country without reading and writing. You don't want to be the rest of your life a dishwasher working for $5 an hour. The economy is changing so fast." All Latino immigrants face challenges as they adjust to the new language. Latinos speak Spanish or are bilingual. However, those Latino immigrants who do not speak English well are seen different by others for their accent. On the other hand, Latino new generations speak fluent English, but are familiar with Spanish in order to communicate with their family. “Nonetheless, there is a similar pattern for all groups: each generation speaks less of the original language, which usually disappears in the grandchildren of Latino immigrants” (Zaldivar). Moreover, some Latino immigrants do not want their children to speak Spanish because they think their children will not assimilate the new culture. “It was Puerto Rico waking up inside her shoving the open door she had shut for years and years. Maybe since the first time she was an immigrant, when she refused to speak Spanish in nursery school”(Morales 210).
Along with the struggle of their homeland language, new immigrant generations have to deal their cultural traditions. Although some people believe every Latino who crosses the border is Mexican, Latinos come from all different cultures. There are tons of Latinos out there from Argentina, Peru, Chile and Puerto Rico. However, the mainstream culture put them all together. All Latinos have traditions of music and dance. Within this tradition is the use of masks for certain dances or celebrations on special days such as carnival, Dia de los Muertos,cinco de Mayo or national holidays. However, many of the cultural traditions from their motherland have been changed or abandoned for new generations. It means new generations are much more likely to eat hamburgers instead of their traditional food.” If your mother saw you she would raise and eyebrow-the same one she arched when, at eight, you turned down sopa with fideo for peanut butter and jelly at lunch”(Curiel 87).
Assimilation is the process in which a culture retains or loses its customs-food, language, and music-while absorbing characteristics of a new culture’s way of life. Some Latino immigrants will assimilate the new culture and some of them will refuse to assimilate. However, Latino immigrants have to decide in what degree they will assimilate the dominant culture without losing their relationship with their family, language, and cultural traditions.
Hello there. I hope that this helps - all the changes I have made are in bold, and any comments I have made are in italics. I hope that this helps!

Latino immigrants coming to the United States have to face the issue of whether or not to assimilate. Understanding this issue is essential to the understanding of the challenges that every Latino has to experience at some point in his or her life; wrestling with this idea is what drives the issue of assimilation. According to Earl Shorris, “the patterns of assimilation will not all be the same; culture persists and, because it persists, determinates how people live in new circumstances”(12). It means that some Latino immigrants will assimilate the new culture and some (I don't think you need "of them") will refuse (no need for "to assimilate" - I think it's repetitive). What does assimilation mean ("mean", not "means"!)? The word assimilation means the way in which cultures retain or lose their customs, such as food, language, and music, while absorbing characteristics of a new culture’s way of life. Latino immigrants have to decide how much of the dominant culture they will absorb, without losing their relationship with their family, their language, or their cultural traditions.

One of the most important factors that distinguishes Latino immigrants from other minorities (you don't need "groups" as well) is their love of family. Having come from countries where family is central, Latino immigrants see family as the major, essential unit against the world. However, the emphasis on family can be somewhat surprising for the children of immigrants growing up in the U.S, where the individual, rather than the family, has central importance in society. In “Real Women Have Curves”, written by Josefina Lopez and George La Voo, Ana, a Mexican-American teenager, has to deal with leaving home to go to college, because her family insists that they cannot be apart from each other.

In addition to assimilating the new culture without the loss of their family relationships, Latino immigrants have to learn a new language, which is significant, because it determinates their identity. Latinos know that they must learn English to achieve success in the U.S. "In many jobs I qualify as a speaker, but I need to read and write," said Mohammad (Who is this Mohammed? You need to say who he is and where he suddenly appeared from!). "You can't go anywhere in this country without reading and writing. You don't want to spend the rest of your life as a dishwasher working for $5 an hour. The economy is changing so fast." All Latino immigrants face challenges as they adjust to the new language. Latinos speak Spanish or are bilingual. However, the accents of the Latino immigrants who do not speak English well are seen to be different by others. Nevertheless, new generations of Latinos speak fluent English, but are also familiar with Spanish for communication with their family. “Nonetheless, there is a similar pattern for all groups: each generation speaks less of the original language, which usually disappears in the grandchildren of Latino immigrants” (Zaldivar). Moreover, some Latino immigrants do not want their children to speak Spanish because they think their children will not assimilate the new culture. “It was Puerto Rico waking up inside her shoving the open door she had shut for years and years. Maybe since the first time she was an immigrant, when she refused to speak Spanish in nursery school.”(Morales 210).

Along with the struggle of their native language, new generations of immigrants have to deal with their cultural traditions. Although some people believe every Latino who crosses the border is Mexican, Latinos come from all different cultures; there are many Latinos out there, coming from Argentina, Peru, Chile and Puerto Rico. However, mainstream culture tends to group all of these together. All Latinos have traditions of music and dance; within this tradition is the use of masks for certain dances, or celebrations on special days such as carnivals, Dia de los Muertos, cinco de Mayo, or national holidays. However, many of the cultural traditions from people's motherlands have been changed or abandoned by the new generations, who are now much more likely to eat a hamburger instead of their traditional food. If your mother saw you, she would raise an eyebrow-the same one she arched when, at eight, you turned down sopa with fideo for peanut butter and jelly at lunch.” (Curiel 87).

Assimilation is the process by which cultures retain or lose their customs, such as food, language, and music, while absorbing characteristics of a new culture’s way of life. Latino immigrants have to decide how much of the dominant culture they will absorb, without losing their relationship with their family, their language, or their cultural traditions.

(Haven't you just repeated this last bit from an earlier paragraph? Try to avoid repetition!)
Thank you so much Perdurable for your suggestions!!!

I appreciate your help,
PilitaEmotion: wink