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Could you please help me with these few sentences I'm having trouble with?

- If you want to know where I was at a particular point in time, just take a look at my pay slips.

- I know what it feel like needing to cry. Promise me you'll tell me what you are thinking at all times.

- The money someone might ask you to lend them is in inverse relation to the money you have. The less money you have the more (the) people will ask.
- I posted the transaction under American Express when it was a Debit Card. (can you use POST UNDER SOMETHING?)

Thank you
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- If you want to know where I was at a particular point in time, just take a look at my pay slips. -- OK

- I know what it feels like needing to cry. Promise me you'll tell me what you are thinking at all times.

- The money someone might ask you to lend them is in inverse relation to the money you have. The less money you have, the more (the) people will ask.

- I posted the transaction under American Express when it was a Debit Card. (can you use POST UNDER SOMETHING?) -- I am not completely sure what you mean. Do you mean that you charged it to your American Express card?
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Hello Mr Wordy,

Let me explain for the last one.

You work at a hotel. A client comes in and pay for they stay with a Debit card. The employee then goes into the system a punches in that X client paid X amount with X card. If I'm the employee I'll say "I made a mistake I posted the transaction under Debit Card in the system when it was an American Express. Now all the counts will be off. They manger will think that they had X amount in/with debit card and Y amount in/with American express. But that's not true as when I punshed it into the computer I said that the person had paid with their Debit card when it was an American Express.

Could you tell me how to say the bold bits properly? Can you say COUNT is off?? and are the underlined words the words that fit?

And could you please tell me if this is OK and how you would say it?

The money someone might ask you to lend them is in inverse relation to the money you have. The less money you have, the more (the) people will ask.

Thank you Mr Wordy
"I posted the transaction under 'Debit Card' in the system" -- In this case "under" is OK. "entered" seems more likely than "posted" (but "posted" is not wrong).

"Now all the counts will be off." -- Intelligible but not a terribly common thing to say. You could say "Now all the amounts will be wrong".

"The manager will think that they paid X by debit card and Y by American Express."

"The money someone might ask you to lend them is in inverse relation to the money you have. The less money you have, the more (the) people will ask." -- Grammatically OK. (I'm sure I answered this one before, but now I can't find the post.)
Thank you

One question

for the last one

What the difference if you leave THE or not?

Thank you
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
alc24for the last one

What the difference if you leave THE or not?
It's more common without "the", meaning "people in general".

"the people" ought to mean some specific group of people -- and in fact it can -- but it can also be a less common (in this sentence) way of saying "people in general". This works because "the people" can also behave as a "universal concept" -- like "the seasons", "the stars", etc.