+1
Hi

Do you find these sentences natural, especially the use of the highlighted words?

Could you please take out some time for me tomorrow?

Could you please take out ten minutes for me now? It's really urgent.

I will really take some time out this week to get together with you and have dinner.

Thanks,

Tom
Comments  
Could you please take some time off for me tomorrow?-- I think this is what you may intend.

Could you please take ten minutes off for me now? It's really urgent.-- But I think I would say 'Could you give me ten minutes now?'

I will really take some time off this week to get together with you and have dinner.
Many thanks, MM!

This is what I wanted to confirm if I could use "take some time out [of your busy schedule]" in the sense of "find some time for me"?

So, can "take off" be used to any person -- I mean, a busy friend, parent, even to the one who is not doing any job at all?

Is this sentence OK now?

Please take some time off your busy schedule and come over tomorrow. There's really so much to talk about.

Thanks again,

Tom
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Mr. TomThis is what I wanted to confirm if I could use "take some time out [of your busy schedule]" in the sense of "find some time for me"?

This is correct.
Mr. TomPlease take some time off your busy schedule and come over tomorrow. There's really so much to talk about.
I like this.
Mr. TomCould you please take out some time for me tomorrow?
Could you please take out ten minutes for me now? It's really urgent.
I will really take some time out this week to get together with you and have dinner.
Hi Tom

I feel comfortable with the third sentence. I would expect this word order: take+(some) time+out. I would NOT use 'out' before the word 'time'.

If 'take time out' is followed by something, a to-infinitive would be pretty common: Take time out to do something.
I am very grateful to all of you!

So, should I understand that "take (some) time out to do something" and "take (some) time off to do something" are equally synonymous?

Tom
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My two cents.

To take time off suggests not going to your normal place of employment.

You take time off (from work) to go on a vacation.
You take time off (from work) if you are sick and need to see a doctor.

By extension, you may take time off from your regular schedule to do something less usual.
________________

To take time out (of your schedule) suggests rearranging your schedule so that you can fit in some other activity.

When you take time out of your day to meet a friend for lunch, you may have to reschedule a haircut or some errand you originally intended to do during that time.

When you take time out of your week to visit a cousin who is in the hospital, you may have to reschedule whatever you had originally intended to do during the time of your visit to the hospital.

CJ
Mr. TomHi
Do you find these sentences natural, especially the use of the highlighted words?
Could you please take out some time for me tomorrow?
Could you please take out ten minutes for me now? It's really urgent.
I will really take some time out this week to get together with you and have dinner.
Thanks,
Tom
I think the second sentence is more acceptable