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Could you explain to me what are differences among following sentences?

I know all of them can express future tense, but don't know what are the exact differences of them in term of nuance.

Thank you.

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1. The president Barack Obama will make a statement tomorrow.

2. The president Barack Obama is making a statement tomorrow.

3. The president Barack Obama is to make a statement tomorrow.

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Comments  
Only one (1) expresses Future tense!
(2) and (3) introduce the 'gerund versus infinitive' issue.

To understand the differences, you need to be very VERY clear on the uses of the Present Tense, and Present Continuous.

So - what sense do you make of (2)?
lucas21c

1. The president Barack Obama will make a statement tomorrow.

2. The president Barack Obama is making a statement tomorrow.

3. The president Barack Obama is to make a statement tomorrow.

# 1 is for sure "future".
# 2 is present progressive with a futuristic overtone ..."tomorrow"
It is common to express upcoming event with present progressive tense. For example: The "Eagles" is comingto the Bay Area next month to do a few concerts. (I made that up!)Emotion: smile So in # 2, "....is making a statement ", " is making" is not a gerund.
#3 to me is mandative (if I could use this word) becasue in a work place, if the manager said " every employee is to follow the protocol as stated in the manual ", he is saying no one is to differ from the rules.
contrastively, # 3 used this form to express that a plan has been devised for the president to appear at a press conference to issue a statement tomorrow.
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So - we've gone full circle, without any real understanding!Emotion: hmmEmotion: smile
You've written:
"It is common to express upcoming event with present progressive tense. For example: The "Eagles" is/are coming to the Bay Area next month to do a few concerts."
BUT
Why not, "The Eagles come to the Bay Area next month..."
OR
"The Eagles will be coming..."

All have 'futuristic overtones'. The question really is, why would a speaker choose one instead of either of the other two?

We'd better sort out your understanding of Present Tense first. Give me a chance to have another wake up cup of coffee - it's only 7 a.m. here - and I'll start on it.
1. The president Barack Obama will make a statement tomorrow.

This isn't a planed event or the speaker doesn't press that the president make a statement tomorrow is planed event.

2. The president Barack Obama is making a statement tomorrow.

This event was planed.

Your sentence is similar to "the president is going to make a statement tomorrow."

3. The president Barack Obama is to make a statement tomorrow.

This kind of sentence is usually seen in newspapers. Some time they can omit the verb "be".

It represents a plan too. However, the structure "be+to infinitive" can convey orders or instructions as in the sentence below

He is to make a statement tommorrow. (He must do it. Someone order him to do it.)
"The president Barack Obama will make a statement tomorrow."

This isn't a planed event or the speaker doesn't press that the president make a statement tomorrow is planed event.


Sorry - NO.Emotion: sad
We have a lot of work to do together! Emotion: geekedEmotion: smile

Don't worry - it'll fun.
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Terryxpress"The president Barack Obama will make a statement tomorrow."

This isn't a planed event or the speaker doesn't press that the president make a statement tomorrow is planed event.

Sorry - NO.

We have a lot of work to do together!

Don't worry - it'll fun.

Hi Terryxpress,

I'm not a native english speaker. So I can't fell the differences between those sentences as english speakers. I just accept the differences that I read in English Gramar books. They explain some cases that we should use "will" or not.

-Why did you make this cake?

-We are going to have a party tomorrow. (the party was planed before)

-Could anyone help me with it?

-I will help you. (I didn't plan to help that person)

Can I use "will" in the first case, and "is going to" in the second one?

No.
But hold your horses(=wait a moment) - give me a chance to start explaining. We need to go back to basics(=start from the beginning in understanding the tenses).
TerryxpressWhy not, "The Eagles come to the Bay Area next month..."
Uh Terry,
Interesting! Though I am a bit hesitant to use present tense (come) to express future event or activity personally. Of course given the proper context, you may be able to deliver the meaning.
Terryxpress"The Eagles will be coming..."
I have no objection to this -Emotion: smile
TerryxpressWe'd better sort out your understanding of Present Tense first.
You are kidding, right? What influenced you to believe that I have problem with understanding the present tense? Even though I am not a born native, I did learn my grammar from a highly qualified professor who had taught in Beijing University for 5 years. I am pretty confident that my English is beyond getting stuck at present tense. But just to satisfy your doubts, I'd do this much:

I come to the forum everyday because I like to share what I know, as well as to learn from the experts. I make mistakes sometimes but I also benefit in the process.

Did I pass ?Emotion: big smile

Oh, by the way, remember this? You said " (2) and (3) introduce the 'gerund versus infinitive' issue ".
Well, as far as I am concerned, I'll point it out again, # 2 is a present progressive sentence, and in no way "making" is a "gerund". I suppose someone needs to sort it out ?Emotion: wink

The president Barack Obama is making a statement tomorrow.

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