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Hi,

It's sometimes confusing me whether a certain noun is countable.

For example, the "bunk beds", as far as I know it can't be a singular noun just like the word " police". But what if I want to say in a bed store, I want two of them("Please don't tell me, I indicate the bed, and say ' I want two of these'"). I have been thinking expressions like "piece of", "lots of", but as you can see clearly here they won't fit to the "bunk beds" so I need help.

In addition to that, what about the word "lettuce"? In my Oxford Dictionary, it can be both countable and noncountable.

Please someone help!

Thanks in advance.
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I don't know quite what you're after here, VC-- I'd order a set of bunkbeds, or (if I had four children or three wives) two sets of bunkbeds.

Like many vegetables, its possible to make 'lettuce' countable, I suppose-- though it is hard to imagine outside the usual situation of discussion of varieties: 'Romaine and Iceberg are two popular lettuces'.
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(if I had four children or three wives)


That's sharp.[A]
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Thanks, Mr.MM

That's all I was wondering.

So the expression for such a word(bunk beds) is " set of".

But as for the vegetable, "lettuce", do you mean the noun becomes countable only if (like your example; Romaine and Iceberg) it indicates different type?

So if I am ordering "Two" vegetable of the same kind, it's uncountable ("lettuce"), but if it is different type("lettuces";Romaine and Iceberg).

Have I understood clearly?

Thanks again.
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Do you mean the noun becomes countable only if (like your example; Romaine and Iceberg) it indicates different type?


Perhaps, but I was just offering a common context where normally uncountable nouns become countable:

The Sunnis and the Shiites are two peoples who have trouble living together.
The Greek and Roman literatures are the sources of all classical mythology.