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Usually, I see the word, lunch, used in uncountable form. I'm not sure if it always applies. I have made up a few examples below.

(1) (Assume that you and your coworkers have lunch at different times.) Mary and Jack, I'll let you decide when you want to have your lunches.

(2) (Assume that a particular restaurant different choices of lunch on its menu.) I want to go to ABC Restaurant to order out a lunch.

(3) I would love to have a seafood lunch.

In my examples, is it okay to use "lunch" countably? Thank you very much.

Comments  
ansonguy(1) (Assume that you and your coworkers have lunch at different times.) Mary and Jack, I'll let you decide when you want to have your lunches.

Either way is OK, "lunch" or "lunches".

ansonguy(2) (Assume that a particular restaurant different choices of lunch on its menu.) I want to go to ABC Restaurant to order out a lunch.

That is possible.

ansonguy(3) I would love to have a seafood lunch.

That is quite ordinary.

The plural form of lunch, "lunches," is a valid word, but it is not often heard in English. Usually "lunch" is used for both the singular and plural. For example:


We had our lunch a ABC restaurant. (The form of lunch here is singular but the plural sense is implied.)

John and Mary had lunch at the ABC restaurant. (Again, the form of lunch is singular here, but the plural is implied.)