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Hi all

I need help regarding this topic. Can someone provide me an explanation as to why the following are uncountable?

-chalk, soap, money, time

From what i know, 'a little' is use with uncountable nouns & 'a few' is use with countable nouns. So are the following sentences correct?? If yes, is it because by using words like 'bars'and 'drops' with nouns, this makes the noun to be countable??

1. A little soap
2. A few bars of soap

3. A little ink
4. A few drops of ink

5. A little bread
6. A few slice of bread

Thanks alot for your help!!
Comments  
Please see the thread "An overtime or a overtime?", which ran yesterday.

All of your phrases are correct apart from 6 - "a few SLICES of bread".

Chalk, soap, money and time are indeed conventionally uncountable. You've probably been told that several times already. Emotion: smile

Rommie
I have difficulties in choosing the correct form in some nouns.
For example, we'd say:

"I have some experience in teaching." - uncountable

but we also say

"He talks about his experienceS as a policeman." - countable

Should abstract concepts always be uncountable? It's what my
teachers told me when I was at school.
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Your teachers were wrong. (Or at least, they were simplifiying things to the point where their explanations were no longer accurate). Please see the other thread I mentioned above.

What I'm trying to get across is that you can use a nominally countable noun in an uncountable context, and you can use a nominally uncountable noun in a countable context.

You see - the universe has got "things" in it. Some of these things we perceive as "smooth", other things we perceive as "lumpy". But MOST things are both. A lump of rock is "a rock", but rock itself is still continuous. The way that you refer to something is what defines whether you are referencing lumps of the stuff or the stuff itself.

"Lumps" of experience are experiences. That's all.

Rommie
Please see the thread "An overtime or a overtime?", which ran yesterday.

All of your phrases are correct apart from 6 - "a few SLICES of bread".

Chalk, soap, money and time are indeed conventionally uncountable. You've probably been told that several times already. Emotion: smile

Rommie
RommieYour teachers were wrong. (Or at least, they were simplifiying things to the point where their explanations were no longer accurate). Please see the other thread I mentioned above.

What I'm trying to get across is that you can use a nominally countable noun in an uncountable context, and you can use a nominally uncountable noun in a countable context.

You see - the universe has got "things" in it. Some of these things we perceive as "smooth", other things we perceive as "lumpy". But MOST things are both. A lump of rock is "a rock", but rock itself is still continuous. The way that you refer to something is what defines whether you are referencing lumps of the stuff or the stuff itself.

"Lumps" of experience are experiences. That's all.

Rommie
I couldn't have said it any better!Emotion: smile
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Thank you.

Can you expand on your statement which said, "What I'm trying to get across is that you can use a nominally countable noun in an uncountable context, and you can use a nominally uncountable noun in a countable context."?

(Is the punctuation right? Should I not include the period?)
But I have a problem, because, they're not giving me sentences, just words, for example, voice, husband, etc.. so, I'm confused about classifying so many words in countable and uncountable words.

Please, can you help me?
Hi,

If you want to post your words and how you classify them, we can check it for you.

Best wishes, Clive
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