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(I used to think that a counter was "counter to" something. I never could think of what, exactly, it was counter to, though.)

All semblance of logic, perchance?

fix (vb.): 1. to paper over, obscure, hide from public view; 2. to work around, in a way that produces unintended consequences that are worse than the original problem. Usage: "Windows ME fixes many of the shortcomings of Windows 98 SE".
Here's the context: "This film astonished everyone, including me, by ... there was a 1922 Oliver Hardy movie callled "The Counter-Jumper".

That may be your take, but it wouldn't be mine. I've never heard of "counter-jumper", but it makes me think ... take probably isn't right, and yours is, since the reference appeared in a UK publication. However, I'm stuck with it.

One of my great-aunts, a kind woman but a bit of a snob with strangers, used to refer to romance novels as "counter-jumper's* delights". Circa 1960, as far as my observations are concerned. CB
*sic
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(I used to think that a counter was "counter to" something. Inever could think of what, exactly, it was counter to, though.)

All semblance of logic, perchance?

Why would I think that? All that puzzles is not necessarily illogical.
Maria Conlon
A very great part of the mischiefs
that vex this world arises from words. (Edmund Burke)
David wrote, in part: What's a rain-darkened room? Has it been flooded?

Doubt it. Don't the light get dimmer when it rains in your part of the world?

I would never think to describe a room as "rain-darkened," any more than it would be "curtain-darkened." A street or a shirt or something else that actually gets wet, sure, but not a room. Does "rain-darkened room" sound reasonable to you?

SML
http://pirate-women.com
Doubt it. Don't the light get dimmer when it rains in your part of the world?

I would never think to describe a room as "rain-darkened," any more than it would be "curtain-darkened." A street or a shirt or something else that actually gets wet, sure, but not a room. Does "rain-darkened room" sound reasonable to you?

Perhaps the poetry in your soul is of a different nature?

Yes, it does sound reasonable. A light shower might not diminish the light levels (much) but a heavy shower or rain will almost certainly make the sky darker and with it, the room. Even in summer, it might become necessary to turn on the light.

http://www.dacha.freeuk.com/cook/22sct-0.htm

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I would never think to describe a room as "rain-darkened," ... not a room. Does "rain-darkened room" sound reasonable to you?

Perhaps the poetry in your soul is of a different nature? Yes, it does sound reasonable. A light shower might ... the sky darker and with it, the room. Even in summer, it might become necessary to turn on the light.

Our dining room was certainly darkened by heavy rain while we were having lunch but I think the expression is rather florid.

The quoted sentence was:
"Sonia laid the pen down on the counter, where it gleamed smugly in the rain-darkened room."
I'd like to know how a pen can "gleam smugly".
I note that the author is one Anthea Turner. Is this the same failed celebrity who presented Blue Peter and the Lottery?

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Perhaps the poetry in your soul is of a different ... summer, it might become necessary to turn on the light.

Our dining room was certainly darkened by heavy rain while we were having lunch but I think the expression is ... the counter, where it gleamed smugly in the rain-darkened room." I'd like to know how a pen can "gleam smugly".

The pen is a publicity hound, and has been getting a lot of ink.
Our dining room was certainly darkened by heavy rain while ... I'd like to know how a pen can "gleam smugly".

The pen is a publicity hound, and has been getting a lot of ink.

I don't know what that means but I'm impressed by the speed of your reply.

Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
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The pen is a publicity hound, and has been getting a lot of ink.

I don't know what that means but I'm impressed by the speed of your reply.

Didn't know the phrase was pondially-challenged. "Getting a lot of ink" means getting a lot of attention in the newspapers and magazines. A film star, or other "personality" that tries to get a lot of media attention would be a "publicity hound".
David Beckham has been getting a lot of ink over here.
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