I know that the word "counter", when used domestically, is predominantly a North American English term (I.e. both U.S. American and Canadian), but I am wondering how far it has encroached on English English. Perhaps the enlightened panel might offer instances where this term has become naturalised within the U.K. (specifically Hertfordshire)?

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I know that the word "counter", when used domestically, is predominantly a North American English term (I.e. both U.S. American ... English English. Perhaps the enlightened panel might offer instances where this term has become naturalised within the U.K. (specifically Hertfordshire)?

What kind of counter? All things counter, original, spare, strange? Counter clockwise? People who add? Surfaces for serving customers?
John Dean
Oxford
I know that the word "counter", when used domestically, is ... this term has become naturalised within the U.K. (specifically Hertfordshire)?

What kind of counter? All things counter, original, spare, strange? Counter clockwise? People who add? Surfaces for serving customers?

The word "domestically" suggests he means a work surface.

Adrian
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What kind of counter? All things counter, original, spare, strange? Counter clockwise? People who add? Surfaces for serving customers?

The word "domestically" suggests he means a work surface.

The very first entry for counter in COD10 is "1 a long flat-topped fitment across which business is conducted in a shop or food and drinks are served. Ø N. Amer. a worktop".
In my home town dialect, the flat surface in the kitchen on which meals were put on plates before taking them to the table was always called a counter. The word seems to have been overtaken by 'work surface' here, but every flat horizontal place at approximately waist height in and around my house has been a work surface at one time or another.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Hertfordshire
England
What kind of counter? All things counter, original, spare, strange? Counter clockwise? People who add? Surfaces for serving customers?

The word "domestically" suggests he means a work surface.

So the 86,500 hits I get on Google linking 'politics' and 'domestically' indicate that Bush and Kerry are locked in dispute about where to chop tomatos? Like http://tinyurl.com/3a62q where the Boston Globe reports "Kerry says Bush hurts US domestically, globally". Though I doff my cap to you for posting a reply an hour before I posted my question.

John Dean
Oxford
The word "domestically" suggests he means a work surface.

So the 86,500 hits I get on Google linking 'politics' and 'domestically' indicate that Bush and Kerry are locked in ... domestically, globally". Though I doff my cap to you for posting a reply an hour before I posted my question.

Hah! Your post arrived an hour before its (indicated) time.
Skitt (in Hayward, California)
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The word "domestically" suggests he means a work surface.

So the 86,500 hits I get on Google linking 'politics' and 'domestically' indicate that Bush and Kerry are locked in ... domestically, globally". Though I doff my cap to you for posting a reply an hour before I posted my question.

You okay, John?
Adrian
The word "domestically" suggests he means a work surface.

The very first entry for counter in COD10 is "1 a long flat-topped fitment across which business is conducted in ... place at approximately waist height in and around my house has been a work surface at one time or another.

Thank you, doc. The reason I asked was that I'm currently reading "The Twelve Apostles" by Anthea Turner in which said writer uses the term. Information about the writer seems quite sparse except that she lives in Hertfordshire. I had wondered if she were of Canadian origin.

I've just finished a book wherein a Jewish wife has a clandestine and amorous liaison with a hunky golem in the woods outside C17th Prague, and I quote: "Finally they came to a place where the tree branches knit over each other so densely that it was like a cave. All was silent save a whippoorwill who called out. /Whippoorwill, whippoorwill./" But the real inconsistency is the word "honour" alongside normal (regular) US spellings such as "saber". Frances Sherwood, "The Book of Splendour".

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Joachim dropped the sheaf of papers on his lap as he fondled the lamb's head and said in exasperation, "This contract is the very devil!"
I know that the word "counter", when used domestically, is ... this term has become naturalised within the U.K. (specifically Hertfordshire)?

What kind of counter? All things counter, original, spare, strange? Counter clockwise? People who add? Surfaces for serving customers?

Tiddlywinks?

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