+0
I heard there was a difference in the meaning of "couple/couple of". In British English it means "few" and in American English it means "two".
Is this true? Because I've watched both American & English movies and really sometimes it does make sence when you hear "couple of..." to take it like they mean "two". But sometimes Americans say "couple of..." and they mean "few".
My question is how can you tell whether someone means "few" or "two" when he says "couple/couple of"?
+0
Hi,

I would say that in both NAmE and BrE, the meanings of 'two' or 'a few' are possible.

The context would often make this clear.

eg Tom and Mary are a married couple clearly means 'two'.

eg I'm hurrying as much as I can. I'll be ready in a couple of minutes sounds like the person does not mean precisely two.

Often, it's not an important distinction. If the matter is important to you, ask for clarification.

eg When you say 'a couple', do you mean 'two'?

Best wishes, Clive
+0
They've been officially married for a couple of weeks.

In that sentence I'd interpret 'a couple of weeks' to mean 'about 2 or 3 weeks'. If I wanted to know precisely how long, I'd ask for clarification.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  
CliveI'll be ready in a couple of minutes sounds like the person does not mean precisely two.
OK, but what about when you say "They've been officially married for (correct me if I'm wrong about the use of "for") couple of weeks."?
Hi Madhulk

"They've been officially married for (correct me if I'm wrong about the use of "for") couple of weeks."?

It should be They've been officially married for a couple of weeks.

As Clive said, couple means two or more than two (a few).
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 Yankee's reply was promoted to an answer.