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I recently asked a question about 'a couple of' and got very good replies. The answer was 'of' must always follows 'a couple' in formal writing. I just want to confirm that the answer also applies to 'a couple [of] seconds'. As an example,

Peter: Hurry up! Mary. We're going to be late.

Mary: I'll be right out in a couple [of] seconds.

Thanks in advance!
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New2grammarI recently asked a question about 'a couple of' and got very good replies. The answer was 'of' must always follows 'a couple' in formal writing. I just want to confirm that the answer also applies to 'a couple [of] seconds'. As an example,

Peter: Hurry up! Mary. We're going to be late.

Mary: I'll be right out in a couple [of] seconds.

Thanks in advance!
Yes. Always use a couple of ...
New2grammarI recently asked a question about 'a couple of' and got very good replies. The answer was 'of' must always follows 'a couple' in formal writing. I just want to confirm that the answer also applies to 'a couple [of] seconds'. As an example,

Peter: Hurry up! Mary. We're going to be late.

Mary: I'll be right out in a couple [of] seconds.

Thanks in advance!

a couple of seconds is correct
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New2grammarI recently asked a question about 'a couple of' and got very good replies. The answer was 'of' must always follows 'a couple' in formal writing. I just want to confirm that the answer also applies to 'a couple [of] seconds'. As an example,

Peter: Hurry up! Mary. We're going to be late.

Mary: I'll be right out in a couple [of] seconds.

Thanks in advance!
"Of" is correct. In rapid speech, however, it may disappear altogether if not reduced to /ə/ (schwa). I do not think either of the alternatives sould be considered incorrect.
so what about "Couples of seconds"? Is this correct?
RevoSonso what about "Couples of seconds"? Is this correct?

Not correct.
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I'm sorry, but I don't agree. I can't speak for the rest of the world, but in the U.S., it's quite common to hear "I"ll be there in a couple seconds," or "it will only take a couple minutes."

Yes, we certainly do say "a couple of," or -- more precisely to how it sounds -- "a coupla," but the of can be completely missing and not sound odd.