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Hi,

Are they all interchangeable? If not, could someone please explain the different meanings among these sentences below?

1.He's been pursuing her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

2.He's been running after her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

3.He's been going after her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

4.He's been chasing her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

5.He's been courting her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

Do they all mean he spends time being nice to her because he hopes to marry her?

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  
Hi,
Very generally speaking, yes.
Although sex and marriage can be two different matters.

Clive
Hi Clive,
Thank you very much.
Can I use 'chase for' here, for example:
He's been chasing for her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

Is there any difference between chase and chase for here?

Do you mean I can use all of the expressions to express that when a man spends time being nice to a woman because he hopes to marry her? Is there any subtle difference among them?

What do you mean by "Although sex and marriage can be two different matters"
Could you please explain?

Thanks a lot.
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AnonymousHi Clive,

Can I use 'chase for' here, for example:
He's been chasing for her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.
"Chase for" is not correct. Use "chase" or "chase after"
He's been chasing after her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

Hi,
Is there any difference in meaning between chase and chase after in the example? Thank you very much.
Hi,
Can I use 'chase for' here, for example:
He's been chasing for her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

Is there any difference between chase and chase for here? Don't say 'chase for'. It's not idiomatic. We sometimes say 'chase after', in casual speech..

Do you mean I can use all of the expressions to express that when a man spends time being nice to a woman because he hopes to marry her? Yes. Is there any subtle difference among them? Not much, but hear are a few comments on subtleties.

1.He's been pursuing her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.
2.He's been running after her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested. Sounds loke he's a bit foolish.

3.He's been going after her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested. Sounds a little like he does not respect her.

4.He's been chasing her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested.

5.He's been courting her for months and yet she's so clearly not interested. Sounds old-fashioned.

What do you mean by "Although sex and marriage can be two different matters" Some men want a woman for sex but not for marriage.

Clive
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Anonymous Is there any difference in meaning between chase and chase after in the example?
Perhaps not always in the mind of the author, but I think of "chasing" as "hot pursuit" and "chasing after" as more at a distance - figuaratively, of course. For example, "chasing" uses direct means (more in your face) while "chasing after" may use indirect means, like asking about someone, or playing detective, or stalking at a distance.
Thank you Clive and Avangi for your helpful replies.

What is the subtle difference between pursue and chase here?

Clive, do you mean all the expressions can also mean a man spends time being nice to a woman because he hopes to have sex with them not marriage?
Hi,

What is the subtle difference between pursue and chase here? I don't see any difference here, although 'chase' sounds more informal and less common.

Clive, do you mean all the expressions can also mean a man spends time being nice to a woman because he hopes to have sex with them not marriage?Yes, except that the rather old-fashioned word 'court' tends to suggest he is thinking about marriage.

Clive
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