+0
Let's say my cousin A marries B who has a cousin, C. Is C now my cousin or cousin-in-law or cousin-by-marriage?

Thanks in advance!
1 2
Comments  
If you are in the American South, you can refer to C vaguely as "distant kin."

If you are in a Jane Austen novel, you can refer to C as "a distant relation."

Otherwise, C is an in-law of your cousin, and really nothing to you. Perhaps C is your friend, and you each of a cousin married to each other.
You cousin's spouse's relatives are too distant to really be considered relatives of yours.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I have seen cousin-by-marriage somewhere and I thought it described the relationship I posted.

Thanks, GG and Nona.
I would think that is the person married to your cousin (person B), not their cousin (person c), which is what you described.

Or it could be a 'step' relationship - i.e. your aunt remarries a man with children, then I suppose you could call the children your cousin-by-marriage, if you wanted to make the point that there is no blood relationship.
it could be a 'step' relationship

This totally makes sense. Thanks, Nona.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Grammar GeekIf you are in the American South, you can refer to C vaguely as "distant kin."

If you are in a Jane Austen novel, you can refer to C as "a distant relation."

Beautiful answer, GG, as usual. I think my father would have used the term "shirt-tail cousin". I've also heard "kissin' cousins", but I have no idea what that means.
Oh, I forgot about "shirt-tail cousin"! Yeah, that too.

I think the kissing cousins thing is that in many states, first cousins can't marry, so if you're a "kissing cousin" you're more distantly related than first cousins. Second or third cousins, perhaps.
so then would it be wrong to marry C?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more