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The company promised to provide credits to customers who had been charged too much.

How much does he have to his credit?

These two words all seem to refer to the money in the bank. When should I use it as the plural form and when should I not in this matter? Plea advise.

LCChang
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When referring to money, use credit. I would say the first one is incorrect.

Credits is a little more complicated to explain. Let me use an example: I recently went on a trip to a resort where we had a meal plan with a certain number of allowances for sit-down meals at a table, quick (fast food) meals at a counter-service restaurant, and snacks. Each time I used one, my receipt listed how many credits I had remaining. A credit it used to exchange it for something. In this case, I could use one of my snack credits to buy an ice cream, or two of my table meal credits for a dinner show, for example.

The first one is correct only if the company provides tokens or some sort of "a credit" that is exchanged from something else, not just money that will be applied against their bill.
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In a business context, credits = Returns, discounts, contra-accounts, and other offsets asserted by account debtors, having the effect of reducing the value of accounts receivable.

It can also be used in academic context - someone gets x number of credits for their work.

And of course those things at the end of a film are credits.

I would say that it has specialized uses.
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Comments  
Grammar GeekWhen referring to money, use credit. I would say the first one is incorrect.

Credits is a little more complicated to explain. Let me use an example: I recently went on a trip to a resort where we had a meal plan with a certain number of allowances for sit-down meals at a table, quick (fast food) meals at a counter-service restaurant, and snacks. Each time I used one, my receipt listed how many credits I had remaining. A credit it used to exchange it for something. In this case, I could use one of my snack credits to buy an ice cream, or two of my table meal credits for a dinner show, for example.

The first one is correct only if the company provides tokens or some sort of "a credit" that is exchanged from something else, not just money that will be applied against their bill.

I see. I must give you credit!! Emotion: smile

However, I copied the first sentence from my dictionary, but I rather believe you are right.

LCChang
Well... never forget that I use American English. And I've been frequently surprised by some of the differences between the various dialects. But that's how *I* would use credits as a countable noun.
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 Feebs11's reply was promoted to an answer.