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what's the difference between them? (this sentence it's correct?)
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My answer reflects British English usage.



There is an overlap between "cabinet" and "cupboard". Some cabinets are really no more than cupboards, but "cabinet" can also refer to a fancier piece of furniture, sometimes with glass panel(s), used for displaying items.


Picture of cupboard (that could also be called a cabinet, especially if in e.g. kitchen or bathroom):

Picture of cabinet that could not really be called a cupboard:


In British English, a "closet" is a walk-in cubicle or small room. It is not a massively common word (actually, it's probably more common in the idiom "out of the closet" than in the literal sense).


I'm pretty sure there are differences in American English, especially with "closet", which I believe means what we in the UK would call a "wardrobe".

demaryiwhat's the difference between them? (this sentence it's correct? Is this sentence correct?)
No. You have made a simple, common mistake. Can you see what it is?
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Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you so much.

And I often forgot to invert in interrogatives Emotion: indifferent
demaryiThank you so much.
And I often forgot to invert in interrogatives
Sorry, I think my reply was confusing. I corrected your question about whether the sentence was correct, like this: this sentence it's correct? Is this sentence correct?

However, I did not correct the mistake in the sentence that you were actually asking about, which was this:

what's the difference between them?



Intead, I suggested that you might like to try to spot the very simple mistake.