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I once read on the paper, "He is cutting his hair", the sentence is wrong, we should always say "He is having a haircut", is it true? The phrase "cutting hair" is incorrect?

:: Edited ::

Okay, maybe I should've given a better example:

- The barber is cutting my hair.

Right or wrong?
Comments  
Hi,

If he is the one with the scissors in his hand, the is cutting his (own) hair. Most people don't do this, so it's not common, but it's not incorrect.

Most parents can tell a story about a child who cuts his or her hair, usually the day before picture day at school.

Also, we tend to say "I'm thinking about cutting my hair" to mean "I'm thinking about a change in hairstyle." It doesn't mean we will do the cutting ourselves.
Hi,
Welcome to the Forum,

Ionce read on in the (news)paper, "He is cutting his hair", the sentence is wrong, we should always say "He is having a haircut", is it true? The phrase "cutting hair" is incorrect?

He is cutting his hair. Sounds like he is cutting his own hair. The word 'own' would normally be used, as I have done.
An alternate meaning of this sentence could be that he is planning to go to the barber/hairdresser in the near future. Compare these to sentences.
eg I am visiting my friend tomorrow.
eg I am cutting my hair tomorrow.

He is having a haircut. Sounds like someone else is doing the cutting.

Best wishes, Clive
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LOL.. Thanks for the correction Emotion: smile

Okay, maybe I should've given a better example:

- The barber is cutting my hair.

Right or wrong?
That's absolutely fine. You can certainly say that someone is cutting your hair.

It's a bad idea to tell the barber a very funny joke while he is cutting your hair or you may end up with a lopsided haircut.

Please don't go back and edit your first post after others have replied. It makes the responses sound ridiculous to later readers who don't know what we were responding to.
Hi,
Okay, maybe I should've given a better example:

- The barber is cutting my hair.

Right or wrong?
Right, in terms of grammar.
In terms of usage, the word 'barber' is rather uncommon, in my experience, and never used by women. You'd more often hear 'I'm having a haircut' or 'I'm having my hair cut'. Women often say 'I'm having my hair done'.

You also have to consider in what context you are likely to say something like this with Present Continuous.
eg perhaps you are sitting in the barber's chair having a haircut, and your friend calls you on the phone and asks 'What are you doing?'
Is this the kind of context you are considering?

Clive
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Well, I don't consider any context, I just wanted to know if the newspaper is right about it, apparently, it isn't. You provided a very good answer and situation, I am grateful for that.

Thanks a lot for helping me everyone, I really appreciate it.

Im cutting my hair