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I would like to express something like that:

It's a pity that I didn't keep up with learning maths when I was at school, because now I have to deal with that backlog.

I can express this as 3rd conditional:
If I had kept up with math at school I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math.

I think that the examples above are quite correct.

Can I express that in this way?:


I have a talk with an old friend:
E: Hi Tom!
T: Hi Emily!
E: It's good to see you again after so long!
E: Can we go for a walk?
T: No, I don't have time. I have to learn math.
E: You should have learnt math when you were at school.
T: I know. I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math now.
E: You're right. CU

What does it mean when I use: I wouldn't have to deal with backlog of math now.
What are the differences between I wouldn't have 3pp and I wouldn't have to...?

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Comments  
TommyekIt's a pity that I didn't keep up with learning maths when I was at school, because now I have to deal with that backlog.

I can express this as 3rd conditional:

If I had kept up with math at school I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math.I'm not much of a numbers man, but I can assure you that your second sentence here does not express your first one. (The time frames are off.)
Your original places the "failed dealing" in past time and the "catch-up dealing" in present time.
Your replacement version places both in past time. (The catching-up is a done deal.)

If I had kept up with math at school, I wouldn't have to deal with with this backlog [now].

If your original had said " . . . . because later I had to deal with that backlog," then your replacement would work.

AvangiIf I had kept up with math at school, I wouldn't have to deal with with this backlog.
is this 3rd conditional, or not?

Does this mean that now I have to deal with backlog of math?

What does it mean:

If I had kept up with math at school I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math.

?

Is it possible to say:

I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math now.

?
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Avangi is right.

Compare

If I had studied more at college, I would be an engineer now. (the main clause denotes the present, not the past)

If I had studied more at college, I would have gotten that job at the clinic. (the main clause refers to the past and denotes an unrealized opportunity)

Basically they both can be seen as conditional III sentences even though the verbs in the main clauses differ.

quote tommyek

Is it possible to say:

I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math now.

No.

Say as Avangi explained in his previous post.

I wouldn't have to deal with this backlog now.
OK, thanks guys.

So, correct conversation should be look like this:
T: No, I don't have time. I have to learn math.
E: You should have learnt math when you were at school.
T: I know. I wouldn't have to deal with backlog of math now.
?
Can I use would have 3pp to express future

What time does the concert start ?
- I would have thought at 6 pm

?
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Tommyekis this 3rd conditional, or not?
Are you asking about my replacement? I'm afraid I'll have to look it up! Emotion: embarrassed
TommyekDoes this mean that now I have to deal with backlog of math?
Yes. It clearly implies that.
TommyekWhat does it mean:
If I had kept up with math at school I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math.
?
Actually, it doesn't make much sense. Both hypotheticals are in the past.
You could say, "If I had kept up with math at school, I wouldn't have created a/this backlog of math."

If you had kept up, the backlog would never have existed, either now or then.
It's impossible to deal with something that doesn't exist, hypothetically or otherwise.
The hypothetical you set up with your "if" statement does not allow for the existence of a backlog.
TommyekIs it possible to say:
I wouldn’t have dealt with backlog of math now.
In my opinion, no, it is not.
"Have dealt" describes a completed action, hypothetical or not.

It's very tricky. Sometimes we say things like, "There! Now I have opened the bottle for you!"
Or, "Oh-oh! Now you've done it!"
The present perfect has these nasty time frames that seem to behave differently with different verbs. These two examples describe events in the VERY RECENT past. (Maybe only one minute ago.)

You could use the present perfect continuous:
If I had kept up when I was in school I wouldn't have been dealing with this backlog now! .

The problem is that "dealing" is by its very nature a continuous process.
But "I have dealt" means that it's over and done with.
You can't use "now" with "I have dealt" unless you're talking about five minutes ago.
There! Now I have dealt with it!
Thanks, you're very helpful!

But, can I say
What time does the concert start?
-I would have thought at 6 pm
TommyekThanks, you're very helpful!But, can I say What time does the concert start?-I would have thought at 6 pm
Simply say

At 6, (I think)

"Would have + pp" always imlies some kind of conditonal

I would have thought at 6 pm, (had it not been for Peter who told me the concert would start at 7)
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