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I often hear ppl say:

Dad's home! As Dad is home! Is this correct? Or

Jamie's home! As Jamie is home!

Are these correct?
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Hi,

Yes.

Is is often abbreviated in that way.

Clive
As Dad is home!
Sorry, but I have never seen 'as' as an abbreviation of 'is'. In fact, the transcription makes no sense to me. 'As Dad is home' does not = 'Is Dad is home', certainly!

I would like some more information if you have it, please, Precious.
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What about:

Kevin's home? Or

Dad's home?

Can it be used the same way in question form?
Kevin's home? Or Dad's home?-- These don't seem to be the same problem as above, but yes, in conversation, these are common question forms, as are:

You're coming?
You've bought another one?
He's lost his car keys again?
Hi,

Kevin's home? Or

Dad's home?

Can it be used the same way in question form?

As you no doubt know, the question word order here is eg Is Kevin home?

But we very, very often ask a question in everyday English simply by making a statement but raising the pitch of our voice at the end. In casual writtten English, we often add a question mark in such a case.

eg Kevin's home?

I assume this is what you are asking about?

Clive
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So it doesn't mean:

Kevin's home....like it's Kevin's home. The home belongs to kevin.

So the punctuation is also very important?
No, I didn't think it meant that-- was that your intention? It is not punctuation but context that determines whether 'Kevin's home?' means 'Is Kevin home?' or 'Is this Kevin's home?'
Hi,

So it doesn't mean:

Kevin's home....like it's Kevin's home. The home belongs to kevin.

That's a valid phrase. But it's not a complete sentence.

So the punctuation is also very important? It's better to say that the context is important.

The context means that English speakers would never, or very rarely, be confused about these meanings.

eg

Kevin's big brother comes in the front door, wearing his overcoat and carrying his brief-case.

His little brother runs to him, hugs him, and shouts 'Kevin's home!'

eg

Tom says to his mother, 'Bye. I'm going out.'

Mother: 'Where are you going?'

Tom: 'Kevin's home'.

Clive
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