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I just read this article on dailymail.co.uk and didn't get the meaning of the following paragraph:
Daily MailIt has emerged that a second passenger train was minutes away from disaster as it narrowly avoided ploughing into wreckage from the crash.
Did another passenger train got to place of accident but didn't crash in?
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It sounds as though it got very close to it (minutes away) but not right to the accident site.

Read through the article and you find:

"John Tilley, regional organiser for the RMT rail union, said that the second train travelling from Scotland to England stopped after the driver was alerted to the accident ahead.

'Luckily, it stopped a couple of hundred yards up the track, but there was literally minutes in it, there could have been carnage,' he said."
Thank you nona. I should rather read through the whole article before asking. I was upset.
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We do seem to be good at having rail crashes here in the UK Emotion: sad
Why do you mean? Were recently any more crashes?
SpinnakerThank you nona. I should rather read through the whole article before asking. I was upset.
I should rather HAVE read through the whole article before asking.
because it's in the past.
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Hi Spinnaker,

There haven't been any others very recently but it seems as though they happen once a year or so, for various reasons, and most people in the UK seem to think 'oh not again' when we hear of one. I'd always thought of these as rare freak accidents but this little list has made me a bit worried now - here is a list of the most recent ones:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6392041.stm

I have no idea how this compares with other countries. The ones this decade from the above link

July 2005: A train driver was killed following a level-crossing collision in Kent.

6 November 2004: Seven people died when a high-speed London to Plymouth train, carrying around 300 people, hit a car parked on a level crossing at Ufton Nervet in Berkshire. Six of the dead were on the train, and one was the car driver.

August 2003: A train driver died after colliding with a car at a level crossing in Kent.

10 May 2002: Seven people were killed and over 70 injured when a WAGN service from London to King's Lynn crashed at Potters Bar, in Hertfordshire. Three of the four carriages derailed and one ploughed along the platform. Former Transport Secretary Alistair Darling ruled out a public inquiry and the Crown Prosecution Service ruled no member of rail staff would face criminal charges, but Network Rail and the line maintenance company Jarvis admitted civil liability in relation to the crash.

28 February 2001: Ten people were killed when a GNER train from York to London King's Cross crashed at Great Heck, North Yorkshire. A Land Rover, driven by Gary Hart, had slid down an embankment from the M62 into the path of the express train, which was derailed and then collided with a freight train. Hart was later jailed for five years for causing death by dangerous driving.

17 October 2000: Four people were killed and a further 35 hurt when a GNER London to Leeds train, travelling at over 100mph, derailed at Hatfield, Hertfordshire. A broken rail was found to be the "substantial" cause of the accident. Engineering company Balfour Beatty was fined a record £10m and Network Rail was fined £3.5m for breaching safety rules in relation to the crash.
Marius Hancu
SpinnakerThank you nona. I should rather read through the whole article before asking. I was upset.
I should rather HAVE read through the whole article before asking.
because it's in the past.
Thank you for correcting me!
Hi nona,

I'm wondered if you have a big railway net in UK.
Furthermore it's sad that there were so many people killed in all accidents.

I'm interested if you travel by train anymore. Does the people from UK look the railway as something good or as something bad?

Thank you very much indeed!
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