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The kidnappers kept me in [the dark/darkness] most of the time and hardly fed me anything.

Which choice is correct? I think both are right but 'in the dark' may confuse the reader as it may mean keeping information from someone.

Thanks in advance!
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Comments  
My interpretation is the same as yours.
'In the dark' will not confuse the reader, if that is what you mean to say. Either one is indeed correct, but only in different contexts.
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The kidnappers kept me in the dark most of the time and hardly fed me anything.

I doubt this would be confusing.

CJ
" . . .kept me in the dark" is the exact phrasing of the idiom for withholding information. Although kidnappers could be considered an early cue, I for one respond to the idiom, and only after a split-second of reflection do I feel sure of the meaning. My reaction is, "I've got to suspend judgement until I finish the sentence." (Definitely not a speed reader.) Granted, the potential for confusion is slight and no one (after reflection) would misunderstand the sentence; but why should we make the reader stumble?

Regards, - A.
"In darkness" is also possible--literally in darkness without any light provided. So: either expression could be used, but if my meaning is the actual situation, "in darkness" is the only one that would be correct. The idiom "in the dark" would definitely make me think only of the withholding of information.
Phew!
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Although kidnappers could be considered an early cue, I for one respond to the idiom I didn't., and only after a split-second of reflection do I feel sure of the meaning. My reaction is, "I've got to suspend judgement until I finish the sentence." Not my reaction. (Definitely not a speed reader. Me neither.) Granted, the potential for confusion is slight and no one (after reflection) would misunderstand the sentence; but why should we make the reader stumble? I didn't stumble. But for those who do: It builds character!Emotion: smile
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CJ
Thanks everyone for your opinions. CalifJim, by the way, what do you mean by 'it builds character'. You totally lost me on that one.
It's a somewhat idiomatic and amusing expression used when someone has a difficulty to overcome. By facing frustrations and challenges and overcoming them, we become better able to face similar difficulties in the future. This strengthening of our ability to face these situations is called "building character".

So when one of your friends is complaining about an unpleasant task he is faced with, you can say, "(Don't worry. It's good for you.) It builds character."

Emotion: smile
CJ
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