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Dear teachers ,

I would appreciate it very much if you correct me if my translation is not correct:

1/ Christmas falls on Saturday , which is our day off , so we are entitled to (a) have /take Monday off in lieu.(b) have /take Monday off in lieu of Christmas.

2/Christmas falls on Saturday , which is our day off , so we are entitled to have /take Monday off as a compensatory day / as a comp day.

3/ If I work on the National Day , I will have the next day off in lieu

4/If I work on the National Day , I will have the next day off as a compensatory day / as a comp day.

Besides, Are there any other ways to express these ideas ? Please help me.

Thanks and Best regards
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1/ Christmas falls on Saturday, which is our day off, so we are entitled to (a) have /take Monday off in lieu.(b) have /take Monday off in lieu of Christmas.

2/ Christmas falls on Saturday, which is our day off, so we are entitled to have /take Monday off as a compensatory day / as a comp day.

3/ If I work on the National Day, I will have the next day off in lieu

4/ If I work on the National Day, I will have the next day off as a compensatory day / as a comp day.
MonalisatuanDear teachers ,

I would appreciate it very much if you correct me if my translation is not correct:

1/ Christmas falls on Saturday , which is our day off , so we are entitled to (a) have /take Monday off in lieu.(b) have /take Monday off in lieu of Christmas.

2/Christmas falls on Saturday , which is our day off , so we are entitled to have /take Monday off as a compensatory day / as a comp day.

3/ If I work on the National Day , I will have the next day off in lieu

4/If I work on the National Day , I will have the next day off as a compensatory day / as a comp day.

Besides, Are there any other ways to express these ideas ? Please help me.

Thanks and Best regards

:

Monalisatuan,

You don’t need a “space” before a comma. For your question about holidays, there are different ways to express it. In the , having weekends off is not a given. Many types of work rely on weekends such as restaurants and entertainment businesses. So based on your post, we have to presume you are working in an office or white-collar environment.

If you are normally off on a national holiday and you are asked to work, you will typically get your regular pay plus a “comp” day which you can take off with pre-approval from you superior.

So we can say:

Christmas this year falls on the weekend; so we are given the following Monday off.

Christmas this year falls on a Sat/ Sun which makes it a 3-day weekend.

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In addition to Feebs excellent corrections, I don't believe "in lieu" works in example 1/. Are we not entitled to a second day off in the first pair of sentences (as opposed to the second pair)? And if so, shouldn't we take Monday off "in addition," rather than "instead/in lieu/in place of"? (If Saturday is your normal day off, you certainly wouldn't be required to work it simply because it's Christmas.)

Am I wrong? The first pair and the second pair represent totally different scenarios, right?

- A.
GoodmanSo we can say:

Christmas this year falls on the weekend; so we are given the following Monday off.

Just a quick note: don't use a semi-colon there. Use a comma instead.

GG,

Thanks for the advice. An old habit learned from a teacher who taught us that if we have two ideas to be expressed in a running sentence and the first can stand on its own but additional information needs to be attached, then semi colon can be used. Whether that was an old-fashioned technique or even a wrong one, I don't know. But I know semi colon is slowing becoming a fading practice, thought unconsciously I sometime still fall into the old habit.
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AvangiIn addition to Feebs excellent corrections, I don't believe "in lieu" works in example 1/. Are we not entitled to a second day off in the first pair of sentences (as opposed to the second pair)? And if so, shouldn't we take Monday off "in addition," rather than "instead/in lieu/in place of"? (If Saturday is your normal day off, you certainly wouldn't be required to work it simply because it's Christmas.)

Am I wrong? The first pair and the second pair represent totally different scenarios, right?

- A.
Personally (as so often in these office memos) I don't think it is clear. I agree it could either be solely the replacement of Saturday [Christmas Day] with Monday as the regular day off, or that you also have Monday as well as Saturday, the Saturday being a public holiday. However, since "in lieu" was included in the sentence, the first was what I went for.
Thank you all teachers,

By the way please kindly tell me whether or not in the USA or UK the three words comp day , compensatory day and compensation day can be used interchangably .Because I 've heard someone use comp day and compensation day in the past ( of course they are not native speakers ).

Thanks again for taking a lot of trouble to help me.

Best regards
In the US, "comp day" is by far the most common.
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