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I'm talking about a trip to South America. I say:

Four days aren't enough. Or

Four days isn't enough.

Please proofread! Thank you!
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Word warrior23 fivejedjon Word warrior23However, “isn’t” is more informal.Well, I wouldn't write that way in a formal letter.
I would. It's natural and correct.
Word warrior23wouldn't write that way in a formal letter
But you could; it would be fine in a formal letter as "Four days is not enough".

CJ
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fivejedjon Word warrior23However, “isn’t” is more informal.I don't think it is. It's just a different way of looking at it.
It sure is natural and correct, but not everyone might be aware of, or comfortable with, this usage and, hence, may think the writer has no sense of grammar, especially if the rest of the text is not very well-written. Therefore, I wouldn’t really endorse it in formal writing. Also, I think it’s a matter of difference between American English and British English. Americans treat collective nouns as singular, while the British don’t usually. I speak British English with Received Pronunciation. Emotion: wink
CalifJim Word warrior23wouldn't write that way in a formal letterBut you could; it would be fine in a formal letter as "Four days is not enough".CJ
Yes, I know I could, but I just wouldn’t for the reason that it may come off as ungrammatical to many people. It’s not a good idea to take the plunge when writing formally. So if I had to write something like that I would probably rephrase the sentence.

By the way, I do think this topic can be a potentially controversial language landmine. Emotion: smile