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Hi,

If today is wednesday, then what would sunday that's gone two days before be called? Would it be last sunday or this sunday? Shouldn't this sunday refer to the coming sunday that is 4 days from today?

Thanks.
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You are right, last Sunday is the Sunday that has past. And this Sunday is the coming Sunday.
thanks for this info
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I don't think it's quite that simple. I will depend on which tense you use.

The lawn needs to be cut again? I did it just this Sunday! (The Sunday that just passed.)

Oh, the lawn needs to be cut again - well, I won't have time to do it until this Sunday. (The Sunday that is coming up.)

Your example used Wednesday, the middle of the week, with either Sunday about the same distance away. If you said something about a Saturday, and said it on a Friday, then "this Saturday" would almost certainly be the next day.

To avoid doubt, you can always say things like "this coming Sunday" or "this past Sunday."

This is a very imprecise area of English.
Grammar GeekI don't think it's quite that simple. I will depend on which tense you use.

The lawn needs to be cut again? I did it just this Sunday! (The Sunday that just passed.)

Oh, the lawn needs to be cut again - well, I won't have time to do it until this Sunday. (The Sunday that is coming up.)

Your example used Wednesday, the middle of the week, with either Sunday about the same distance away. If you said something about a Saturday, and said it on a Friday, then "this Saturday" would almost certainly be the next day.

To avoid doubt, you can always say things like "this coming Sunday" or "this past Sunday."

This is a very imprecise area of English.

So, you mean it all depends on the tense that is being used, is it?
Simi
Grammar Geek
I don't think it's quite that simple. It will depend on which tense you use.

The lawn needs to be cut again? I did it just this Sunday! (The Sunday that just passed.)

Oh, the lawn needs to be cut again - well, I won't have time to do it until this Sunday. (The Sunday that is coming up.)

Your example used Wednesday, the middle of the week, with either Sunday about the same distance away. If you said something about a Saturday, and said it on a Friday, then "this Saturday" would almost certainly be the next day.

To avoid doubt, you can always say things like "this coming Sunday" or "this past Sunday."

This is a very imprecise area of English.

So, you mean it all depends on the tense that is being used, is it?

Yes, exactly.
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Simi, your question is straightforward in the first place. What would the Sunday be called four days from today Emotion: smile ? Sothis Sunday refers to the coming Sunday. Yeah, to make it clearer, it's better to say ' this coming Sunday '.
Higuys,

You could, of course, also just say 'on Sunday'. eg He called her on Sunday. eg He is going to call her on Sunday.

Such things are commonly said.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you, people.Emotion: smile
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