Greetings.
During lunch with my German colleagues today the following question arose: why is it that English has adopted a German word, "Dachshund" (lit. "badger dog"), to refer to a particular breed of long-bodied, short-legged German dogs, when German itself does not use this word for the same breed? The German term for dachshund is "Dackel", which is probably much easier for English speakers to pronounce, at least from spelling. (Except for the velar fricative , the English "Dachshund" has largely retained its German pronunciation; a more phonetic spelling would be something like "doxhoont" or "doxhoond", though "daxund" is also sometimes heard. In any case, it isn't pronounced much like the way it's spelled according to typical English rules.)
I've got etymological dictionaries for English but not for German. Merriam-Webster says that "dachshund" entered English around 1882. Was this also the name used for this breed in German at that time, with Dackel being a later invention? If so, why the name change? Seems "Dachshund" ought to have stuck, since the dogs were, after all, used for hunting badgers. If not, why the disparity in terminology? If "Dackel" was the proper German name for the dog in 1882, why didn't it win out over "Dachshund"?
Regards,
Tristan

V.-o Tristan Miller (en,(fr,de,ia)) >`-' -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= <> In a haiku, so it's hard (7 \\ http://www.nothingisreal.com / >
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During lunch with my German colleagues today the following question arose: why is it that English has adopted a German ... German term for dachshund is "Dackel", which is probably much easier for English speakers to pronounce, at least from spelling.

So it is for German speakers. "Dachshund" is still extant (and still means the same dog), but the shorter forms "Teckel" and "Dackel" have evolved from it in the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively (according to Kluge, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache).
(Except for the velar fricative , the English "Dachshund" has largely retained its German pronunciation; a more phonetic spelling would be something like "doxhoont" or "doxhoond", though "daxund" is also sometimes heard.

"Dachshund" is pronounced with a (ks) (i.e. "x") both in English and in German, isn't it?
Michael
I've heard "DACK-sh'nd" ('[email protected]) in BrE.
And isn't it a throat-cleary "DAKHS-hoont" ('daxshunt) in German?

Ross Howard
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Except for the velar fricative , the English "Dachshund" has largely retained its German pronunciation

The /ch/ in Dachshund is regularly pronounced (k), so these letters are pronounced the same in both languages. This is usually not true with the vowels as you know and with the final -d which becomes voiceless as all consonants at the end of a German word.
Dackel was formed at the end of C19 as diminutive of Dachs (badger) which was a shorthand of the full form Dachshund.
As you might guess, the orthographic change from /ch/ to /ck/ simply resolted from the loss of the /s/. Though /chs/ always is pronouced (ks), /achel/ would have become (axEl) and could not reflect the actual sound.
Gerd
Except for the velar fricative , the English "Dachshund" has largely retained its German pronunciation

The /ch/ in Dachshund is regularly pronounced (k), so these letters are pronounced the same in both languages. This is usually not true with the vowels, as you know, and with the final -d which becomes voiceless as all consonants at the end of a German word.
Dackel was formed at the end of C19 as a diminutive of Dachs (badger) which in turn was a shorthand of the full form Dachshund.

As you might guess, the orthographic change from /ch/ to /ck/ simply resulted from the loss of the /s/. Though /chs/ always is pronouced (ks), /achel/ would have become (axEl) and therefore could not reflect the actual sound.
Gerd
I've heard "DACK-sh'nd" ('[email protected]) in BrE. And isn't it a throat-cleary "DAKHS-hoont" ('daxshunt) in German?

It's sort of docks-hoont or more precisely ("dakshUnt) in German.

Gerd
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"Dachshund" is pronounced with a (ks) (i.e. "x") both in English and in German, isn't it?

I've heard "DACK-sh'nd" ('[email protected]) in BrE.

What an odd word to get a spelling pronunciation!
And isn't it a throat-cleary "DAKHS-hoont" ('daxshunt) in German?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
During lunch with my German colleagues today the following question arose: why is it that English has adopted a German ... a particular breed of long-bodied, short-legged German dogs, when German itself does not use this word for the same breed?

The explantion is, as you guessed, that the word "Dachshund" was at one time used for these animals but has come a little out of fashion since then (but not completely out of use). The everyday name for these dogs is "Dackel", but hobbyists and professional breeders usually call them "Teckel". For example, take the following breeder's and owner's associations:
* Deutscher Teckelklub 1888
http://www.dtk1888.de /
(Seems to be the most important organisation.)
* Bayrischer Dachshundklub 1893
http://www.dackelklub.de /
* Dachshundklub Württemberg und Hohenzollern
http://www.dachshundklub.de /
As you can see, the three vocables Dackel, Teckel, and Dachshund are all used in reference to these dogs.
The German term for dachshund is "Dackel", which is probably much easier for English speakers to pronounce, at least from spelling. (Except for the velar fricative , the English "Dachshund" has largely retained its German pronunciation;

"Ch" before a consonant is pronounced like "k", so the English pronunseeashun should be correct in this regard.
Merriam-Webster says that "dachshund" entered English around 1882. Was this also the name used for this breed in German at that time, with Dackel being a later invention?

Dackel is indeed a rather new word. The Duden didn't include it until
1915. I don't know why the form "Dackel" managed replace otherwell-known and logical words to such a large degree - there probably is no specific reason, it just happened. Today, Dackel or whatever you like to call them are not usually trained for hunting badgers anymore, so the association that comes with the word "Dachshund" is obsolete.

- Sebastian

Da halte ich es mit Lenin, der gesagt hat: Bevor die Deutschen eine Revolution machen, kaufen sie sich eine Bahnsteigkarte.

(Werner Hackmann)
Greetings. During lunch with my German colleagues today the following question arose: why is it that English has adopted a German word, "Dachshund" (lit. "badger dog"), to refer to a particular breed of long-bodied, short-legged German dogs,

OED's earliest cite is for dachshound
when German itself does not use this word for the same breed?

Most entertaining in my Collins German Dictionary to see German 'Dackel' = English (sic) 'dachshund'
If "Dackel" was the proper German name for the dog in 1882, why didn't it win out over "Dachshund"?

Same reason 'Pudel' didn't win out over poodle - we're British. Americans transmute the French 'berger allemand' into the understandable 'German Shepherd' and we still insist on 'Alsatian'. Like, for some weird reason, we call the Japanese 'koi' a 'koi carp'.

John 'Don't forget the dorgis' Dean
Oxford
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