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Do all sentences mean the same and are they correct?

The hotel is far from here.
The hotel is far away.
The hotel is far away from here.

Doeas "away" mean "from here" in some cases?
I'm confused about it.

Thanks for replies, I find this forum very useful.
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tmn111Doeas Does "away" mean "from here" in some cases?
Yes, I suppose you could look at it that way. "away" means "not at the location referenced", so if you don't mention the location specifically, it means "away from here", "not here", "not at this location". You can, however, say "away from there", meaning "not at that location":

I'm going to visit Central Park today. It will be a long walk for me when I return because the hotel is far away from there.

In this case the hotel is far (away) from Central Park.

There is also the expression keep away. Keep away from the machines while they are in operation. This means you should not stand "at the location of the machines".

away is often added in front of from.
tmn111Do all sentences mean the same and are they correct?

The hotel is far from here.
The hotel is far away.
The hotel is far away from here.
Yes. All are correct. And the following are also correct:

The hotel is far from there.
The hotel is far away from there.
The hotel is far from the park.
The hotel is far away from the park.
The hotel is far from the bank.
The hotel is far away from the bank.

CJ
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Hi tmn,
tmn111
What about: The hotel is away from the bank? etc., without "far".

No, that's not idiomatic.
tmn111
Can I say the examples you wrote interchangeably?

You can use "there" instead of "the park" or "the bank" as long as your listener knows what you mean. You can say "far from" or "far away from" interchangeably.
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Thank you.

What about: The hotel is away from the bank? etc., without "far".
Can I say the examples you wrote interchangeably?
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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tmn111What about: The hotel is away from the bank? etc., without "far".
No. Without "far" the meaning changes, and then we only use "be away" or "be away from" when the subject is a person, and the person is not at his usual place.

-- Where is Mr. Jones? I need to talk to him about these accounts.

-- Sorry. Mr. Jones is away. He will return in about an hour.

-- Did you call the doctor?
-- Yes, but he was away from the office. His secretary took a message.

-- How did the boss react to your request?
-- Well, unfortunately, he was away from his desk, so I wasn't able to talk to him at all.

If you say "The hotel is away from the bank", it may seem to your listener as if the hotel works at the bank, but it has gone out to lunch and will return to the bank later! Emotion: smile
tmn111Can I say the examples you wrote interchangeably?
Yes. You can generally use either far from or far away from interchangeably. away emphasizes physical distance, however, so you cannot usually add away when you are speaking abstractly, thus:

What he said was far from the truth. [idiomatic]
What he said was far away from the truth. [not idiomatic; not recommended]

CJ