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On 14 Aug 2004, Bob Cunningham wrote

I think there's something missing somewhere in that sentence, but I'm not sure where.

You bet: I dropped a "t" when I let it be...

So, are you saying that you or others think/thought of "blitz" as completely interchangeable with "blitzkrieg"? I never thought that, myself, and I never saw an apostrophe, although maybe I missed something. (I have seen the ones by "phone" and "bus".)

M-W dates both "blitz" and "blitzkrieg" as 1939. I think of "The Blitz" as the big series of air-raid attacks on London, and "blitzkrieg" as the quick land (plus air) invasion of the Continent, or that style of warfare.

Curious Donna Richoux
On 14 Aug 2004, Bob Cunningham wrote You bet: I dropped a "t" when I let it be...

So, are you saying that you or others think/thought of "blitz" as completely interchangeable with "blitzkrieg"? I never thought that, myself, and I never saw an apostrophe, although maybe I missed something. (I have seen the ones by "phone" and "bus".)

Yes as far as I know to your queries: "blitz" (non-capitalised( is a shortened form of "blitzkrieg", and the two were seemingly interchangeable.
"The Blitz" with the article and a capital "B" refers to the London episode. (Or at least it does in UK usage: the current edition of Collins still has separate entries for "blitz" which it notes is an abbreviation and for "Blitz, the", and "blitzkrieg".)

As for the apostrophe, I've not seen it for a few years, but I think I first came across it in topographical works published shortly after the war. I'll keep an eye out for it and re-post if I can narrow the dates down.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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Yes as far as I know to your queries: "blitz" (non-capitalised( is a shortened form of "blitzkrieg", and the two were seemingly interchangeable.

Not in American football lingo though. "Blitz", meaning defensive backs joining the rush in an effort to disrupt or sack the quarterback, is used exclusively.
Brian Rodenborn
Yes as far as I know to your queries: "blitz" (non-capitalised( is a shortened form of "blitzkrieg", and the two were seemingly interchangeable.

Not in American football lingo though. "Blitz", meaning defensive backs joining the rush in an effort to disrupt or sack the quarterback, is used exclusively.

The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang has, as the first football use, a 1958 quote, which was describing a memorable game of 1940. 1940 is the first record it has of the military use.

Best Donna Richoux
On 14 Aug 2004, Bob Cunningham wrote You bet: I dropped a "t" when I let it be...

So, are you saying that you or others think/thought of "blitz" as completely interchangeable with "blitzkrieg"? I never thought that, ... attacks on London, and "blitzkrieg" as the quick land (plus air) invasion of the Continent, or that style of warfare.

I've always seen 'blitz' as an abbreviation for 'blitzkrieg'. 'Blitzkrieg' = 'lightning war' which is the style of aggression where you go all out for victory and move forward at your fastest speed. The German WW2 air campaign was part of blitzkrieg because it involved maximum effort without respite against the enemy, and the land campaign (it wasn't an 'invasion' of the continent because the Germans were already *on* the continent) was also based on blitzkrieg principles - a full tilt advance against the enemy without spending undue time consolidating gains.
Compare and contrast 'sitzkrieg'

John Dean
Oxford
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On 14 Aug 2004, Bob Cunningham wrote You bet: I dropped a "t" when I let it be...

So, are you saying that you or others think/thought of "blitz" as completely interchangeable with "blitzkrieg"? I never thought that, myself, and I never saw an apostrophe, although maybe I missed something. (I have seen the ones by "phone" and "bus".)

It always relates to the Blitzkrieg but needn't equate to it. 'Blitz' and 'blitz' stand on their own though with not need for final apostrophes, from what I see in the OED.
M-W dates both "blitz" and "blitzkrieg" as 1939. I think of "The Blitz" as the big series of air-raid attacks on London, and "blitzkrieg" as the quick land (plus air) invasion of the Continent, or that style of warfare.

In the first case, once 'of the Continent' is edited, 'Blitzkrieg' is always capitalized. Not in the second though.

Charles Riggs
Yes as far as I know to your queries: "blitz" (non-capitalised( is a shortened form of "blitzkrieg", and the two were seemingly interchangeable.

Not in American football lingo though. "Blitz", meaning defensive backs joining the rush in an effort to disrupt or sack the quarterback, is used exclusively.

Kewl, but it wasn't used that way before 1940, you can be sure. It relates, but doesn't equate, to the Blitzkrieg.

Charles Riggs
I've always seen 'blitz' as an abbreviation for 'blitzkrieg'. 'Blitzkrieg' = 'lightning war' which is the style of aggression where ... was also based on blitzkrieg principles - a full tilt advance against the enemy without spending undue time consolidating gains.

But it is Blitzkrieg, even in English. However, you can say 'She shoveled the paperwork to her boss at blitzkrieg speed'.
Compare and contrast 'sitzkrieg'

I may do so while in my sitz bath.

Charles Riggs
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Not in American football lingo though. "Blitz", meaning defensive backs joining the rush in an effort to disrupt or sack the quarterback, is used exclusively.

The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang has, as the first football use, a 1958 quote, which was describing a memorable game of 1940. 1940 is the first record it has of the military use.

Yup, the first use of the word was either in 1940, which I believe because the OED says so, or 1939, according to M-W, not that my 'Yup' implies a 'blitz' in football is a slang word. It may once have been, but it is kosher today.

Charles Riggs
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