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It's still a straw man: you're ignoring the distinction between abbreviations and {contractions and clipped forms}. In an abbreviation, letters ... spelled "'phone". An ending period indicates an abbreviation, not merely "that letters have been omitted somewhere in the preceding word".

I find your logic interesting, but your terminology not unassailable. A contraction is one type of abbreviation.

The relevant definition of "abbreviation" in Webster's Third New International Dictionary is
2 a : a shortened form of a written word or phraseused for brevity in place of the whole made
commonly by omission of letters from one or more
parts of the whole (as abbr for abbreviation, amt
for amount, bldg for building, doz or dz for dozen, recd for received, H.E. for His Eminence and His
Excellency, N. Y. for New York, r.p.m. or RPM for
revolutions per minute) sometimes showing
substitution or other alteration in the part or
parts retained (as bbl for barrel, cwt for
hundredweight, oz for ounce, Xmas for Christmas)
and sometimes doubling of initial letters to show
plural form (as ff for folios, pp for pages, SS
for Saints)
And in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary 11th Edition the etymology of "Mr." calls it an abbreviation:

Etymology: Mr. from Middle English, abbreviation
of maister master; Messrs. abbreviation of
Messieurs, from French, plural of Monsieur
I've always seen 'blitz' as an abbreviation for 'blitzkrieg'. 'Blitzkrieg' ... advance against the enemy without spending undue time consolidating gains.

But it is Blitzkrieg, even in English. However, you can say 'She shoveled the paperwork to her boss at blitzkrieg speed'.

It's either. OED cites The Times and the NY Daily News using lowercase.

John Dean
Oxford
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But it is Blitzkrieg, even in English. However, you can say 'She shoveled the paperwork to her boss at blitzkrieg speed'.

It's either. OED cites The Times and the NY Daily News using lowercase.

Not so, John, not when referring to the German's methods in WWII: I looked again. As I said, it can be used in other ways. Then it isn't generally capitalized.

Charles Riggs
Evan Kirshenbaum (Email Removed) wrote, in part:
I saw a letter today that started "Dear Honored Guest:". ... to discuss, shouldn't there be a comma between the adjectives?

I'd say that the "dear" here isn't really an adjective, but is rather marking a sort of vocative construction, much as "O" once did.

So it's a case marker, then, I suppose?
When I Was Growing Up(TM), we used to call case markers 'prepositions'. These were 'from', 'by', 'to', ans some others. (Actually, a good many others.) 'To', for example, usually marked the dative case, and 'of' the genitive. 'Throughout' marked a case for which we didn't have a name (although perhaps the grammarians did). But it marked a case and was a complete word we put before the noun it marked the case of, so we called it a preposition.

Now come these two words, 'O' and 'Dear', and EK and others are saying that they mark the vocative case. Okay, so English has a case I never heard of. No problem. But what are these words, 'O' and 'Dear'? They are case-markers that appear before the noun whose case they mark. Does that make them prepositions? They're certainly not nouns, adjectives (or articles), verbs, adverbs, interjections, or conjunctions, so what else can they be?
Michael Hamm
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