Here is a mini lesson for those native English-language speakers that write as though they haven't yet completed the third grade:
1) The contraction "you're" has not disappeared form the English language. I suggest that you resume its use. Do not simply use"your" everywhere.
2) Stop abusing the verb "to get". Everyone is getting this and getting that. You don't "got" the latest gadget; you "have" thelatest gadget.
It's really not that hard... or is it?

To the world at large: I implore you to not let so-called American English ruin a perfectly good language! Fight it in every e-mail that you post and in every Usenet message that you post. Together we can make a difference.

News Guy
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Here is a mini lesson

or, rather, "mini-lesson"
for those native English-language speakers that

or, more elegantly, "who"
write as though they haven't yet completed the third grade:

I know not this third grade of which you speak.
1) The contraction "you're" has not disappeared form the English language. I suggest that you resume its use. Do not simply use "your" everywhere.

Are you, seriously, talking to AUE?
2) Stop abusing the verb "to get". Everyone is getting this and getting that. You don't "got" the latest gadget; you "have" the latest gadget.

You could got out of here, though. There are old gentlemen trying to sleep.
It's really not that hard... or is it?

Speak for yourself. Mine's reasonable for my age.
To the world at large: I implore you to not let so-called American English ruin a perfectly good language! Fight it in every e-mail that you post and in every Usenet message that you post. Togetherwe can make a difference.

Kinda like "third grade", you mean?
Here is a mini lesson for those native English-language speakers that write as though they haven't yet completed the third grade: 1) The contraction "you're" has not disappeared form the English language. I suggest that you resume its use. Do not simply use "your" everywhere.

Language is a shared thing, and evolves and develops with common usage. Do not treat it as if it is you're personal posession and everyone must do things you're way Emotion: wink
2) Stop abusing the verb "to get". Everyone is getting this and getting that. You don't "got" the latest gadget; you "have" the latest gadget.

And the reason I have the latest gadget is because I went and got it.

I got a loaf of bread (implied: earlier today.)
I have got a loaf of bread (implied: and I've a mind to make toast.) I have a loaf of bread (implied: and you don't; so neener, neener.)
It's really not that hard... or is it?

You're use of the definitive "it", here, is ambiguous, and you're meaning is unclear. And you're not REALLY going to scold the world for its abuses of American English after that paragraph, are you?!
To the world at large: I implore you to not let so-called American English ruin a perfectly good language! Fight it in every e-mail that you post and in every Usenet message that you post. Together we can make a difference.

By "so-called" to you mean to imply that there is no such thing as American English? And how would you have us fight something which does not exist? Together, we HAVE made a difference; we got a difference, and it is ours. It is unclear whether you prefer vast differences or wish for everyone to do things you're way.

Please take off your shoes before arriving at my in-box. I will not, no matter how "good" the deal, patronise any business which sends unsolicited commercial e-mail or that advertises in discussion newsgroups.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
It's really not that hard... or is it?

Not really, but using a correct signature seperator is, apperently.

Martijn van Buul - (Email Removed) - http://www.stack.nl/~martijnb / Geek code: G - Visit OuterSpace: mud.stack.nl 33 The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' (I found it!) but 'That's funny ...' Isaac Asimov
Boy are going to have a long talk about this
starting with my 20 years of studying the transmission of language and the fact that English is a combined language...
lets chat...
Here is a mini lesson for those native English-language speakers that write as though they haven't yet completed the third grade:

Here's a mini-lesson for those people who write Usenet-articles
1) The contraction "you're" has not disappeared form the English language. I suggest that you resume its use. Do not simply use "your" everywhere.

1) Make sure you use a right margin of less than 80 characters -
72 seems to be a widely accepted value

(snip)
It's really not that hard... or is it?

No.

2) The correct signature separator is "newline-dash-dash-space-newline".Omitting the space is not considered good netiquette.
To the world at large: I implore you to not let so-called American English ruin a perfectly good language! Fight it in every e-mail that you post and in every Usenet message that you post. Together we can make a difference.

3) Contrary to popular belief, only one signature seperator should beused.
News Guy

4) Keep your signatures short; use a maximum of 4 lines.

'nuff said.

Martijn van Buul - (Email Removed) - http://www.stack.nl/~martijnb / Geek code: G - Visit OuterSpace: mud.stack.nl 33 The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' (I found it!) but 'That's funny ...' Isaac Asimov
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
On 27 Nov 2004 17:06:51 GMT, Martijn van Buul
Not really, but using a correct signature seperator is, apperently.

I think you mean 'separator'...
Chris C
1) The contraction "you're" has not disappeared form the English language.

That should've been "from", presumably.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.e.u)
Here is a mini lesson for those native English-language speakers that write as though they haven't yet completed the third grade:

Look what you've done to the requote with your use of ridiculously long lines?
1) The contraction "you're" has not disappeared form the English language. I suggest that you resume its use. Do not simply use "your" everywhere.

The most common usenet typo seems to be 'you' for 'your'. A proper spell checker would put up all the uses of 'you' in context and let you check and see if you'd done it again.
2) Stop abusing the verb "to get". Everyone is getting this and getting that. You don't "got" the latest gadget; you "have" the latest gadget.

I expect that it's got that use from well before you were contemplated.
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