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This sentence is grammatically confusing to me . I would like to find out if it is correct to say "I wouldn't have to manage my anger if people would manage their stupidity" ??
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Beata KolasinskaOMG The more I know the less I understand
I sympathise. The problem for many learners (and some teachers) is that many coursebooks, and grammars written for students, suggest that we never use will or would in an if- clause. This is just not true. It is true that we do not use these word when they imply, as they often do, the speaker's certainty about the future, and a sentence such as "I will stay at home tomorrow if it will rain" is normally unacceptable. However, if you know that will and would can be used to express willingness, then their acceptability in if- clauses becomes more understandable
I would use caution here because such a statement is really a belittling opinion. You don't want to be heard insulting others and in the process admitting to having an anger issue. Used in humor you would need to smile and perhaps help the other person straighten out their errors. Thanks.
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All the questions stemmed from the "if" clause and subjunctives are much bigger and more profound than a few discussions can explain. However, the " will " use in "if " clause is usually a condition 1 scenario, which is common, just like the one below, which is not considered a " subjunctive". But this one is: The weather looks unsettled. If it were to rain this coming Saturday, Mary' and John's outdoor wedding plan would likely be cancelled and moved indoor.
fivejedjon"I will stay at home tomorrow if it will rain"
I agree, this sentence is fine, except ".....it will rain." Normal utterance is: I will [most likely/ probably] stay home if it rains tomorrow. Even though tomorrow is a future aspect, the second "will" is not conjugated. It's important for learners to realize that the construction of "if " clauses and its subordinate clauses are rotatable, meaning we can say " : I will [most likely/ probably] stay home", if it rains tomorrow
fivejedjonBeata KolasinskaOMG The more I know the less I understand
Beata Kolasinska: This is a good reference for conditionals:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditional_sentence

The first context involves the possible outcome of an event that is likely to occur:
If + Present Simple/Present Progressive + Present Simple/Present Progressive/Future Simple/Future Progressive/Imperative
  • If + I miss the bus, + I will be late for school

The second context involves the possible outcome of an event that is less likely to occur; various sentence structures are possible for this context:
If + Present Perfect/Present Perfect Progressive/Preterite/Past Continuous + Full Infinitive + Conditional Present/Conditional Present Progressive
  • If + I was + to miss the bus, + I would be late for school.
In some dialects: If + Imperfect Subjunctive + Full Infinitive + Conditional Present/Conditional Present Progressive
  • If + I were + to miss the bus, + I would be late for school.
In some dialects: If + modal auxiliary "should" + Bare Infinitive + Conditional Present/Conditional Present Progressive
  • If + I should + miss the bus, + I would be late for school.
The latter two formulations, with the imperfect subjunctive or the modal construction, can be modified to use subject-verb inversion instead of the conjunction if:
  • Were I + to miss the bus, + I would be late for school.
  • Should + I miss the bus, + I would be late for school.

The third context involves the hypothetical outcome of an event that did not occur:
If + Pluperfect/Pluperfect Progressive + Conditional/Conditional Progressive/Conditional Perfect/Conditional Perfect Progressive
  • If + I had missed the bus, + I would have been late for school.
Here too the conjunction ifcan be replaced by subject-verb inversion:
  • Had I missed the bus, + I would have been late for school.

In each formulation it is possible to reverse the order of the clauses; however, the protasis must always follow the word "if" or exhibit subject-verb inversion:
  • If + I miss the bus, + I will be late for school can be adjusted to I will be late for school + if + I miss the bus.
  • Should + I miss the bus, + I will be late for school can be adjusted to I will be late for school + should + I miss the bus.
Beata KolasinskaThis sentence is grammatically confusing to me . I would like to find out if it is correct to say "I wouldn't have to manage my anger if people would manage their stupidity" ??
Yes, it is correct - perfectly grammatical and natural-sounding.

The modal verb would in the if-clause expresses a conditional meaning, and the first clause I wouldn't have to manage my anger expresses the consequence of that condition being fulfilled.

BillJ
The sentence was intended as a joke.
It's part of a series of witty insults towards humanity called e-cards. Part of their beauty is their utter cynism and anger.
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Thanks
so what's the difference between these two:

If people would manage their stupidity, then I would not have to manage my anger.
If people managed their stupidity, then I would not have to manage my anger.

Thanks.
If people would manage their stupidity, then I would not have to manage my anger.
The actual situation is that people will not (are not willing/prepared) to manage their stupidity.

If people managed their stupidity, then I would not have to manage my anger.
The actual situation is that people do not manage their stupidity.
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PooyanIf people would manage their stupidity, then I would not have to manage my anger.
Emphasis on the reciprocal nature of the relationship. If these people do something for me, then I do something for them.
PooyanIf people managed their stupidity, then I would not have to manage my anger.
Ordinary conditional statement. If the situation in the if-clause happened to apply (and we aren't saying it does apply), the situation in the consequent clause would come about.

CJ