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(Up bounds away!) What this sentence means? This Cartoons video is about a hamster driving an airplane takeoff. Before airplane take off ,The hamsters says (Up bounds away!). I check it on my electronic dictionary but no result. I suspect that subtitles written wrong. Please help me! I want to know this sentence exactly meaning.
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It's not standard English.
Most hamsters don't speak good English! Emotion: big smile
I found the correct subtitle on youtube, this sentence called "up up and away".
7FOpWRTcxtQ

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(I posted this reply before the above post appeared.)

Could it just be "Up and away!"? If you can post a link to the cartoon then we can check.

By the way, I notice that you are making the error of using brackets to quote words. This is incorrect. Do not write this:

The hamsters say (Up bounds away!).

Write this instead:

The hamsters say "Up bounds away!".

This kind of misuse of brackets is quite common in forum posts here. I am interested to know why it arises. May I ask you why you used brackets in your post?
Thanks for that! you make a correct answer, it is "up and away". I found a native speakers subtitle on the youtube.link is
7FOpWRTcxtQ

Point 01:14/04:57

I will answer your question about "brackets".
The answer is: brackets are bigger than the quotation mark, And I don't know if my question is exactly correct up expression my meaning. To ensure more accurate,I used brackets. I don't know the other quizzer's reason,But I think It might be same to me.

Maybe it has deeper reason, Maybe it because the culture.
English culture(Maybe include all western countries for example German culture) = Exactly and precise and accurate (So the quizzer doesn't need to worry about other problems. For example to worry about answerer didn't catch exactly meaning of the question. )

******* culture = vague and careless and inexactly (So the quizzer need to worry about other problems. For example to worry about answerer didn't catch exactly meaning of the question. and hairbrained to answer the irrelevant solution. So it's about conventional thinking.)

Trust me If someone want to learn english very well, And he or she is not a native speaker for english. Then He or she must love english culture ,He or she must love "Exactly and precise and accurate". Must hate "vague and careless and inexactly".His former life must be a westerner, only this life born in the wrong place.He want to go home, where everyone is principled, very kind. So he must to learn English very well.
Joey SuI will answer your question about "brackets".The answer is: brackets are bigger than the quotation mark, And I don't know if my question is exactly correct up expression my meaning. To ensure more accurate,I used brackets.
I see, thanks. Just to expand on my previous answer, when quoting or mentioning words, phrases and sentences in English, three styles are possible:

Double quotation marks, "like this".
Single quotation marks, 'like this'.
Italics, like this.

Brackets are, as I mentioned, incorrect for this purpose.
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I "got" 'it' thank you.
Another question these three styles are all same?
For example :
1、The hamsters says"Up up and away!"
2、The hamsters says'Up up and away!'
3、The hamsters says Up up and away!
or The hamsters says "Up up and away!"

The meaning is all same?
Thank you for your time.
Joey Su1、The hamsters says"Up up and away!" 2、The hamsters says'Up up and away!'
These two mean the same. The choice between double and single quotation marks is a style choice. Some people may have rules for when to use one or another, but not everyone follows the same rules.

There needs to be a space before an opening quotation mark.

"The hamsters says" is incorrect. Correct are "The hamster says" and "The hamsters say".

You are also using the wrong comma for English. You are using the Chinese or Japanese comma.
Joey Su3、The hamsters says Up up and away!
This is a less usual style. Italics are usually used for mentions rather than direct speech. For example, if I wanted to talk about or refer to the word wibble, I could use italics (or quotation marks).
Joey SuThe hamsters says "Up up and away!"
There needs to be a contextual reason to put the whole sentence in italics. For example, someone else said or wrote The hamster says "Up up and away!".