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Could someone give me the definition of "to bode well with"?

My best guess is that if something bodes well with you, you find it agreeable; but my Google search did not give me an exact definition, and I'd like to be sure.

Also, how does this (idiomatic?) phrase relate to the verb "to bode (to foretell bad or good fortune)"? Am I right in thinking that by saying "X bodes well with me.", you mean "X foretells good fortune for me, therefore I find it good"?

Thank you very much for reading and thank you in advance for your answers Emotion: smile
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First, the phrase is 'to bode well/ill for'; I have never seen it with 'with'. COCA supplies 265 examples of 'bode well for' but only one example of 'bode well for'. It is a rather old-fashioned phrase and hence often a jocular or literary term little used in everyday conversation or writing.

'Bode' is of course the root, which mean 'suggest the future', so the phase 'bode well/ill for' means 'to portend good/bad luck or experience, or success/failure, in the future for'.
The verb bode is used to suggest that something is a good/bad sign for someone.

The sentence 'X bodes well for me' may indicate that the presence of X brings you good luck or is good for you.
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Hello Mister Micawber,

thank you for answering my question and so quickly, too!

I am still a bit puzzled, though; because when I Google searched for "bodes well with", the search engine came up with over 600,000 hits. Including the following example:
"Future of tournament bodes well with early exits from stars"
http://www.dailymail.com/Sports/201107311466
which is a newspaper heading, I believe, and although the press cannot always be trusted (of course!), it seems to suggest that the phrase is in use.

Now you tell me that there is no such phrase, however, I wonder if I was mistaken in thinking of "to bode well with" as a full phrase. Could it be that the phrase is simply "to bode well(/ill)" and "with" is just there to give you additional information? Can the above heading be saying "Future of tournament bodes well, as the stars exits ealy?"

Even then, there are still many examples of "bodes well with me", which seem to imply what I said in the original question. "Cheap beer bodes well with me." came up at the top of my search result:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/creativecliche/6202801364 /

Can all these instances be simply mistakes? I'd be most grateful if you could enlighten me further.

Also, could you tell me what COCA is? If it is a reliable sourse for examples of word usage, I'd very much like to make use of it too.

I'm sorry for the long post and thank you again for your help!
Hello Mentee,

thank you for your answer!

I still have the questions I mentioned above in my reply to Mister Micawber's answer, but thanks to the two of you, I'm now at least clear on the verb "to bode" Emotion: smile

If you can tell me anything more on the subject, I'd be most glad to hear. Thanks again!

...when I Google searched for "bodes well with", the search engine came up with over 600,000 hits. Including the following example:"Future of tournament bodes well with early exits from stars" http://www.dailymail.com/Sports/201107311466

Could it be that the phrase is simply "to bode well(/ill)" and "with" is just there to give you additional information? Can the above heading be saying "Future of tournament bodes well, as the stars exits ealy?"-- Yes, I think that is precisely the structure.

Even then, there are still many examples of "bodes well with me", which seem to imply what I said in the original question. "Cheap beer bodes well with me." came up at the top of my search result:
/ Can all these instances be simply mistakes?-- I will not say they are 'mistakes'; I just say that they are not the standard usage.

Also, could you tell me what COCA is? If it is a reliable sourse for examples of word usage, I'd very much like to make use of it too. -- COCA is the Corpus of Contemporary American English, one of several available at this website: http://corpus.byu.edu . Corpora (and you can find even more by googling 'corpus of English') are collections of reputable spoken and written texts (from speeches, telecasts, books, magazines and newspapers), so they are much more reliable sources of accepted language than are google hits per se.

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Hello again Mister Micawber,

thank you so much for your answers and especially for telling me about corpora! I was never aware such resources existed online. I'm very happy now Emotion: smile I always took Google with a pinch of salt, but I thought there was no other option when I failed to find an expression in dictionaries. I'll certainly be using them--probably right after I post this. Thank you again!
I still use Google for quick, rough estimates, but remember that the number of hits must be in the hundreds of thousands (preferably in the millions) before a turn of phrase can be safely considered 'standard' in any way.
I'll make sure to bear that in mind, thank you!
Thank you for your time and for such valuable advices Emotion: smile
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