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Hello,
I was told that "My shopping's just been delivered" sounded odd and "dropped off" should have been used instead. Is that true? What is wrong with deliver?
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My orders / packages / mail / purchases have just been delivered. (Formal. A delivery company brought them to your door.)
My orders / packages / mail / purchases have just been dropped off. (Informal. A friend brought them to your door and then left.)

Shopping is not the items you bought. It is the activity of buying them.
If I bought a few things from a supermarket online, I could have them delivered. That's why I think that "deliver" works in this sentence. I am not saying that "drop off" is odd/wrong/etc. For some reason I always pick the slightly more formal word. Which one would you choose?
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AlpheccaStarsShopping is not the items you bought. It is the activity of buying them.
It could be that there are regional differences then. Here in the UK, "shopping" is quite commonly used to refer to items bought.
It is and my friend's from the UK. I wonder why "deliver" sounded odd to her in that context. Does it sound odd to you as well?
Gene93I was told that "My shopping's just been delivered" sounded odd
Well, it doesn't sound odd.
Gene93and "dropped off" should have been used instead.
No. ... could have been used ...

It's your choice. 'deliver' is slightly more formal.

CJ
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CalifJimIt's your choice
My choices get me into a lot of trouble, trust me. It was the first verb that came to me. I don't know why.
Gene93CalifJimIt's your choice My choices get me into a lot of trouble, trust me.
OK. In that case you must use "deliver". No excuses. No whining. (I'll be watching you.)

Emotion: wink
CJ
Gene93Does it sound odd to you as well?
No.
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