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Let them eat cake— so said Marie Antoinette or so some say she did.


Is the 'so said' clause dependent. Could you not say:


Let them eat cake. So said Marie Antoinette or so some say she did.


Online defintion of dependent clause.

a dependent clause—will begin with a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun and will contain both a subject and a verb . This combination of words will not form a complete sentence .


You can start sentences with conjunctions. And it has the subject and a verb. Sometimes I can't tell if it's a dependent clause or a complete sentence especially when the em dash is separating them. As it can be done for emphasis or to split two related sentences up.

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panda blue 483Let them eat cake—so said Marie Antoinette, or so some say she did.
Is the 'so said' clause dependent?

No.

[Actually, she said "Qu'ils mangent de la brioche", or so go the whispers of history.]

panda blue 483Could you not say: Let them eat cake. So said Marie Antoinette or so some say she did.

Yes. That's OK. It's two independent clauses. The initial "so" is an adverb, not a conjunction, if that's what you're thinking.

panda blue 483Online definition of dependent clause. a dependent clause—will begin with a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun and will contain both a subject and a verb. This combination of words will not form a complete sentence. [No space before the final punctuation mark please.]

This definition is somewhat approximate. Non-finite clauses often lack a subject, a conjunction, and a relative pronoun. Nothing important hinges on this, however, with regard to your examples in this thread.

CJ