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Hi, guys. I was doing some CPE tests and it turned out to be a tad controversial.Would you be so kind to shed some light on it? Thank you so much in advance.

1. I was reading this ........ story in the newspaper about animal experimentation. (my answer - horrid, theirs - horrific). They are quite the same to me.

2. He made some ........ errors of judgement during his time with the organisation. (my answer - horrible, theirs - horrendous). "Horrible" is used to emphasize how bad something is, isn't it?

3. I was ........ when I heard the company were planning to make most of its employees redundant. (my answer - horrified, theirs - horrified). OK.

Would the teachers or people who verify it tick them off as correct answers? Emotion: smile
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Hi,

I was doing some CPE tests and it turned out to be a tad controversial.Would you be so kind to shed some light on it? Thank you so much in advance.

1. I was reading this ........ story in the newspaper about animal experimentation. (my answer - horrid, theirs - horrific). They are quite the same to me.

I don't use either of these words much. Often, I think of them as the same, but here are a couple of comments on nuances.

horrid - suggests the horriblenesss is an attribute of the story.

Not a very strong word. eg I might say 'This tea tastes horrid' but I wouldn't say 'This bloody accident was horrid'.

horrific - suggests the story makes other people experience horror in their minds.

2. He made some ........ errors of judgement during his time with the organisation. (my answer - horrible, theirs - horrendous). "Horrible" is used to emphasize how bad something is, isn't it?

I use both of these words quite often.

horrendous - I usually think of this as a stronger word than 'horrible'.

3. I was ........ when I heard the company were planning to make most of its employees redundant. (my answer - horrified, theirs - horrified). OK.

Clive
Comments  
1. To me, "horrific" fits better. Dictionary definitions don't necessarily seem to reflect this, but to me, "horrid" usually describes something that is unpleasant in one's everyday life but probably fairly trivial in comparison to the true horrors of the world. It can also have a childish feel to it ("Mum... he's being horrid to me!). "horrific" feels much stronger -- more truly terrible.

2. Both "horrible" and "horrendous" work for me.
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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you, Mr. Wordy and Clive. Now I get it.