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hello,

Please could you tell me if I can use present perfect while describing the picture and if the sentence below is correct? if not, please correct it (the sentence is a description of what I see in the picture)

The bus has tilted to one side as a result of being overcrowd with people and their uneven distribution over the bus.

The bus has tilted to one side becasue of the fact that there are to many people on it and they are distributed ubevenly.

thank you.
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Please could you tell me if I can use present perfect while describing [the] A picture and if the sentence below is correct? if not, please correct it (the sentence is a description of what I see in the picture)

JTT: Of course you can, Guest. As a report of the incident, the present perfect is perfectly natural in these types of situations, a finished action that is important to now. {"corrections", I have put in capitals}

The bus has tilted to one side as a result of being overcrowdED with people and ALSO BECAUSE OF THE [their] uneven distribution OF THOSE PEOPLE WITHIN [over] the bus.

The bus has tilted to one side because of the fact that there were [are] toO many people on it and they WERE [are] distributed uNevenly.
Thank you JTT.

I have one more question.

Why did you use past tense in the second sentence ('were' instead of 'are") as I remeber being tought to use present tense while describing a picture.

ex.
She is cooking, washing etc.

Why can we not say "too many people are on the bus"?

thanks,
Jarko
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I have one more question.

Why did you use past tense in the second sentence ('were' instead of 'are") as I remember being taught to use present tense while describing a picture.

ex.
She is cooking, washing etc.

Why can we not say "too many people are on the bus"?

==

While this is a good general rule, it doesn't describe how we use language in every situation. But the rule isn't simply "use present tense to describe what you see in pictures". The rule is, use the tense that works best with the context of the actual situation.

Is this situation two reporters discussing an old picture or is this two officials discussing a picture that has just been taken of a situation that is still current, ie. there still are too many people on the bus.

How do we decide? Context context context and context.
I would not myself use 'were' instead of 'are', as that suggests the bus is tilting because of a previous overload that has since been remedied. But buses tend not to tilt once the problem that caused the tilting has been resolved.

So I would only say:

1. ...because of the fact that there ARE too many people on it and they ARE distributed unevenly.

I might say on the other hand:

2. The bus is lying on its side because of the fact that there were too many elephants in it and they were distributed unevenly, which made it topple over when it turned the corner too quickly.

Here, context requires 'were'.

MrP
MrP:
I would not myself use 'were' instead of 'are', as that suggests the bus is tilting because of a previous overload that has since been remedied. But buses tend not to tilt once the problem that caused the tilting has been resolved.

JTT: What we find, if we care to look to the situation as defined by the person who posed the original query, IS a picture that shows a bus tilted. It is not all that difficult to imagine something falling into a state of tiltedness and remaining so even after the unevenly distributed load is removed.

So when this bus has its load of people removed, and it remains stuck in the mud/snow, tilted to the left or right, EVEN Mr P, viewing a digital shot of the now empty tilting bus "would only say",

1. ... because of the fact that there WERE too many people on it and they WERE distributed unevenly.
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The original sentence specifies the cause of the 'tilt'. If the cause is removed, the bus will no longer tilt.

MrP
while describing the picture ... (the sentence is a description of what I see in the picture)
The original sentence specifies the cause of the 'tilt' in the picture. If the cause had been removed, the bus would no longer be tilting.

If the bus were stuck in mud or snow, the cause of the tilt would be 'because of the fact that it's stuck in mud or snow'.

This isn't a question about the many strange experiences travellers on public transport undergo. It's about a specific sentence. In that sentence, we are provided with a cause of the tilt. We need seek no further. Occam's razor.

MrP
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