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Then there's Jack Jones.

Friend of Tod Sloane

Were they so intimate, though? I thought "on your jack" meant "on your ***", taking "jack" as an abbr of "jacksy". Certainly "Left me on me jack" could mean "Left me sitting on my ***" with the implication of "on my own". Partridge Hist. Sl. has only "jacksie/y" = "***" (or, as Partridge puts it, "the posteriors").
My father was fond of the expression "like a shag on a rock", meaning alone and exposed, with, I think, either of the implications that one had been abandoned or that one should have been doing something else.

Mike.
Friend of Tod Sloane

Were they so intimate, though? I thought "on your jack" meant "on your ***", taking "jack" as an abbr of ... "on my own". Partridge Hist. Sl. has only "jacksie/y" = "***" (or, as Partridge puts it, "the posteriors").

Eric's Dic of Slang and Unc Eng has "Jack Jones" in all its glory. And OED has enough cites for both Jack Jones and Jack toot caught to indicate that it was used for more than "left me alone".
e. Slang phr. on one's jack = on one's own, alone (short for on one's Jack Jones: see 35e below).

1931 'G. Orwell' Coll. Ess. (1968) I. 71 Jack, on his: on his own. 1935I Clergyman's Daughter iii. 197 Michael went off on his jack an' left me wid de bloody baby. 1936 (see grass n.1 12). 1968 M. Woodhouse Rock Baby ix.
93 You're off on your jack then? 1973 R. Parkes Guardians x. 193, I thoughtI could go sneaking in there all on my jack and bring out the evidence.

(35) e. Jack Jones: rhyming slang for 'alone'; usu. in phr. on one's Jack Jones: on one's own; alone. Cf. sense 2e above.

1925 Fraser & Gibbons Soldier & Sailor Words 130 Jack Jones, alone. 1935'G. Orwell' Clergyman's Daughter ii. 156 A good night's kip all alone.+ All on your Jack Jones. 1958 P. Scott Mark of Warrior ii. 168 You're on your jack jones again. What do you do? 1972 A. Draper Death Penalty xx. 134 You're on your Jack Jones. Ben's deserted you.
And under "grass" there is ...
1936 J. Curtis Gilt Kid ii. 22 Tell you the details and then you'll do thegaff on your jack+or else turn grass.
Going "off on your jack" or doing a gaff "on your jack" doesn't sit with the "***" theory, I think.
My father was fond of the expression "like a shag on a rock", meaning alone and exposed, with, I think, either of the implications that one had been abandoned or that one should have been doing something else.

I am inclined to believe that Monsieur's father was an amateur ornithologist. Unless he was a professional?
My mother used to say "like piffy on a rock bun" - as does Vera Duckworth. Make of that what you will.

John Dean
Oxford
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Eric's Dic of Slang and Unc Eng has "Jack Jones" in all its glory. AndOED has enough cites for both ... grass. Going "off on your jack" or doing a gaff "on your jack" doesn't sitwith the "***" theory, I think.

No, indeed. Bang goes another.
My father was fond of the expression "like a shag ... been abandoned or that one should have been doing somethingelse.

I am inclined to believe that Monsieur's father was an amateur ornithologist. Unless he was a professional?

The late Lyle Snr would have been unchuffed at that. One of the apparently motiveless prejudices (how long have you got?) which gave him so much pleasure was a cordial dislike of birdwatchers.
My mother used to say "like piffy on a rock bun" - as does VeraDuckworth. Make of that what you will.

Less open to misinterpretation than the formula favoured by the author of my being.

Mike.

Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
So let's move away from it again. An Aus version is "on yer Pat" or "on me Pat Malone". I don't know who Mr, or Ms, Malone was, if anybody.

I suppose that could be this Pat Malone:
http://www.grandpapencil.com/stories/colonial/malone.htm

I didn't know that song, but if you back up a level on that site, most of the others listed there are very well-known songs.

Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au