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On 10 Mar 2007, Spehro Pefhany wrote

San Marino?

But the original statement that I challenged wasn't about "totally homogeneous" nations: it was that "all nation consist of provinces or states".

I changed to "homogeneous" because the differences between counties, provinces, states, etc is little more than legal terms which vary from country to country.
Can you think of any nation that is totally homogeneous???

Andorra?

Nahh, a group of people whose only agreement is that they don't want to be Frence or Spanish!
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On 10 Mar 2007, Greg Procter wrote

Can you think of any nation that is totally homogeneous???

Most smaller island nations, I think. I stand to be corrected, of course, but I don't think New Zealand (for ... there are District/Regional Councils, but those strike me as not the same thing at all as a "province" or "state".

Sure we have provences; Southland, Otago, Canterbury, Marlborough , Wellington etc etc. They stopped having legal significance about a century ago but they still have regional significance to those of us who live there.
On 10 Mar 2007, Greg Procter wrote Most smaller island ... the same thing at all as a "province" or "state".

Harvey, you should keep in mind you are talking to an imbecile with absolutely no comprehension, ability to provide proof of his claims, and a guy that believes everything the Chinese government mandates his people to know. Just giving you the heads up.

Harvey, when Chris holds his head up and waves it about you can be sure he's not using it to think with.
But the original statement that I challenged wasn't about "totally homogeneous" nations: it was that "all nation consist of provinces or states".

I changed to "homogeneous" because the differences between counties, provinces, states, etc is little more than legal terms which vary from country to country.

It's much more fundamental than that: they're legally quite different.
Unlike counties, States/Provinces/Lander/whatever are not statutory creatures of a national government: they have constitutional status, and cannot be eliminated by the national legislature.

District Councils and counties, on the other hand certainly in England not only can but also have been wiped off the legal map by national statutes.
That can't happen to the states of the U.S., or to the provinces of Canada.

Cheers, Harvey
Canadian and British English, indiscriminately mixed
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This may be a wild and crazy idea, but the ... refers nominally to the entire Americas (North, South and Central),

No it doesn't.

Of course it does, just as Europe refers to a specific region ans Asia refers to a specific region/continent.
not to just one part.

Just us, Booby.

Stop pretending to be stupid!
England (as opposed to the UK) falls into this category: the English counties are not even remotely equivalent to "provinces" or "states".

I'd certainly disagree with you there!

You can disagree with it all you like, but they're legally quite different.
The UK government can abolish or create and in the past has indeed abolished and created/re-created counties. (Huntingdonshire, Avon, Rutland, anyone?)
The same doesn't hold for provinces and states: they're constitutional elements and the national government (for example in the US and Canada) does not have the constitutional power to abolish them as legal entities.

Cheers, Harvey
Canadian and British English, indiscriminately mixed
On 10 Mar 2007, Greg Procter wrote Most smaller island ... the same thing at all as a "province" or "state".

Sure we have provences; Southland, Otago, Canterbury, Marlborough , Wellington etc etc. They stopped having legal significance about a century ago but they still have regional significance to those of us who live there.

That's the point: states and provinces as understood in other countries have constitutional legal status: they're not ad- hoc, informal areas, and exist as legal entities which cannot be eliminated by a national government.

Cheers, Harvey
Canadian and British English, indiscriminately mixed
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Django Cat wrote, in part: Um, I think that's shuffling "off" to Buffalo. YMMV.

MMDV to the extent that you shuffle off this mortal coil; what you do to Buffalo is do the soft-shoe shuffle off to it.

Hmm. That doesn't explain why anyone (DC or you) would say "shuffling up to Buffalo."
Me, I would shuffle off, whether it involved going to Buffalo or to that place that starts with H, whatever that may end up being.

What do you do with cards? Shuffle them, shuffle them up, or something else?
(If I knew how, perhaps I'd just stack them.)

Maria
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