Two new-to-me Britishisms, from an article in yesterday's Register:

(quote) http://www.theregister.com/2005/04/13/desk skiving/ The Register Odds and Sods Bootnotes
Brit workers excel at skiving
By Lester Haines
Published Wednesday 13th April 2005 15:06 GMT
New figures have shown that Brit workers lead the world in "desk skiving" - the art of aimlessly faffing about at their posts when they should be lining shareholders' pockets with filthy lucre. Shockingly, the maths demonstrate that a third of workers may be taking fourteen days extra hols a year while a hard core of eight per cent admit that they are texting, doing personal emails or surfing the web for interesting stories on skiving British workers for an astounding 12 weeks per annum.
(/quote)

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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CyberCypher had it:
Two new-to-me Britishisms, from an article in yesterday's Register: (quote) http://www.theregister.com/2005/04/13/desk skiving/ The Register Odds and Sods Bootnotes ... emails or surfing the web for interesting stories on skiving British workers for an astounding 12 weeks per annum. (/quote)

Skiving is a normal word which I think we've discussed before. I've never heard of desk skiving, but it's obvious what it means.

Faffing about is an extremely common term, indeed I said it myself earlier today after an unsatisfactory project review.

David
==
replace usenet with the
the Omrud wrote on 15 Apr 2005:
CyberCypher had it:

Two new-to-me Britishisms, from an article in yesterday's Register: (quote) ... British workers for an astounding 12 weeks per annum. (/quote)

Skiving is a normal word which I think we've discussed before. I've never heard of desk skiving, but it's obvious what it means. Faffing about is an extremely common term, indeed I said it myself earlier today after an unsatisfactory project review.

Neither of my Brit officemates has used either term as far as I know. I'll try them out next week after exams.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
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CyberCypher had it:

Two new-to-me Britishisms, from an article in yesterday's Register: (quote) ... British workers for an astounding 12 weeks per annum. (/quote)

Skiving is a normal word which I think we've discussed before. I've never heard of desk skiving, but it's obvious what it means. Faffing about is an extremely common term, indeed I said it myself earlier today after an unsatisfactory project review.

It's been around a long time, I think, but got a big boost in popularity from Rowan Atkinson's "Thin Blue Line".

Don Aitken
Mail to the From: address is not read.
To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
CyberCypher had it:

Two new-to-me Britishisms, from an article in yesterday's Register:

Skiving is a normal word which I think we've discussed before. I've never heard of desk skiving, but it's obvious what it means. Faffing about is an extremely common term, indeed I said it myself earlier today after an unsatisfactory project review.

I've always spelt "faffing", "pfaffing", with the "p" silent as in swimming pool.
Will.
CyberCypher had it:

Two new-to-me Britishisms, from an article in yesterday's Register:

Skiving is a normal word which I think we've discussed before. I've never heard of desk skiving, but it's obvious what it means. Faffing about is an extremely common term, indeed I said it myself earlier today after an unsatisfactory project review.

I've always spelt "faffing", "pfaffing", with the "p" silent as in swimming pool.
Will.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
CyberCypher had it:

Skiving is a normal word which I think we've discussed ... said it myself earlier today after an unsatisfactory project review.

I've always spelt "faffing", "pfaffing", with the "p" silent as in swimming pool.

Relating to Johann Friedrich Pfaff?

John Dean
Oxford
It can't possibly be related to Pfaff, that's too much like the sewing machine and in my book that's too much like work.
But I can remember 'faffing' as used by my mother (usually critically, imagine that) for well, as long as I can remember.

And skiving suffice it to say, I read the OP ahem at my desk. Where I'm not, of course, now, because I don't faff around that much at my desk. Of course not.
cheers,
Stephanie
Brussels
Andrew Gwilliam had it:

Oh, you're skiving off this week?

Hmmm. To me, "skiving off" is transitive and requires a thing off from which one is skiving.

Not to me. In fact, the only thing that people "skive off" is work, so any object would be redundant.
"skiving" on its own is both intransitive and transitive and is my more normal use.

May I see an example of transitivity?
I don't skive any more.

I couldn't if I wanted to.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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