+0
Hi

Could you please help me make this sentence natural? I am not sure of my choice of the yellow parts.

(Person reminiscing about his childhood)

Despite so many years having passed, I can still smell the aroma of the fresh cakes and biscuits permeated/settled in our street, permanently issuing from the grand bakery.

or

Despite so many years having passed, I can still smell the aroma of the fresh cakes and biscuits permanently permeated/settled in our street, issuing from the grand bakery.

Thanks,

Tom
+0
So many years have passed, but I can still smell the fresh cakes and biscuits whose aroma, issuing from the big bakery, permeated our street.
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I'm grateful!

MM, doesn't it happen sometimes that some smells permeate some places forever - I mean, the moment you enter that place your nostrils are filled with that particular smell. And if you feel the same smell somewhere else, you've a deja vu, I mean, that smell takes you back to that particular place. So, in my original sentence, I was trying to give the sense of "permanence".

Could you please see it once again?

So many years have passed, but I can still smell the fresh cakes and biscuits whose aroma, issuing from the big bakery, permanently permeated our street.

Many thanks for your time and effort.

Tom
The word is unnecessary. 'Permeate' alone is strong enough.