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From my searching, I have found:

Determiner Question words:
which, what, whose

In questions, these words ask which thing or person is being referred to. They are placed before the noun.
  • Which dress are you going to wear tonight?
  • What colour is your dress?
  • Whose car are you going to use?

and

Adverb Interrogative:
why, where, how, when
They are usually placed at the beginning of a question.

Examples:
  • Why are you so late?
  • Where is my passport?
  • How are you?
  • How much is that coat?
  • When does the train arrive?

With the determiner, there's a noun in front of the main verb. Is this the only difference between the two? And why isn't 'what' included with the adverb list? As in: What is your name?

Thanks for any help,
Rudy
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I'll leave the rest of the question to others, but I can answer the very last one.
What isn't an adverb; rather, it's a pronoun. Think of the question as a mathematical equation:
what [is(=)] your name?
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With the determiner, there's a noun in front of the main verb. Is this the only difference between the two?
Having the noun in front of the verb is not the important part. What is important is that the determiner is followed by a noun.
... why isn't 'what' included with the adverb list?
Because it's not an adverb. It doesn't ask any questions about the main clause. It asks for the subject of the clause.

For example, in When does the train arrive? the main clause is already known: The train arrives. When? asks for additional information about the main idea that the train is going to arrive. But if you ask What is arriving? you're not asking for information about the time of some action already known; you're asking for the noun (the thing) that is the unknown subject of the clause. The answer is made by giving a noun, not an adverb: What is arriving? The train.

CJ
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Comments  
Thanks so much! Great explanation!
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