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Hello,
I'm trying to find a way to break up a word into syllables without knowing anything about the word. I found a way at http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/teaching_techniques/ellis_unknownwords.html which is:

1. Isolate the prefix.
2. Separate the suffix.
3. If the first letter in the stem begins with a consonant, underline three letters.
4. If the first letter in the stem begins with a vowel, underline two letters.
5. Repeat steps 3 & 4 for each subsequent set of letters in the stem until all letters have been underlined and thus grouped into syllables

Now my question, is this method 100% accurate? Also is there anything else I need to know about this method?

Thanks in advance.
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This method is not 100% accurate. It seems to fail sometimes.

In fact, according to this method the word "fail" would have two syllables, "fai" and "l". So ,there must be an exception for smaller words.

Also, the word "determine" has true syllables of "de", "ter", and "mine". This method gives "det", "er", "min", and "e".
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Hmm... that's not good. Emotion: sad

Are there any exceptions you know of?

Or better, a diffrent method that's more accurate.
I don't know of any other method except for just sounding out a word and/or tapping the desk.

I suspect that no method will be 100% accurate simply because the correlation between spelling and pronunciation is not 100% consistent.

More words that don't work:
mo-ni-tor
e-pi-pha-ny

Sorry!
Emotion: sad
Sounding out the word and tapping wouldn't work because I'm trying to make an AI chatbot that dosn't use an online dictionary. Instead the program goes through the sentence and looks for certain keywords such as am, were, do, not, ect... and analyzes what type of input the user wrote (question, negative statement...).

For a while it worked, but then there started to be special rules for adding prefixes/suffixes where the spelling depended on how many syllables a word had. That's why I posted here looking for a method.

~Justin
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